Ethics and Research with Children: A Case-Based Approach

By Eric Kodish | Go to book overview

6
Recruitment of Pregnant, Minor Adolescents and Minor Adolescents at Risk of Pregnancy into Longitudinal, Observational Research: The Case of the National Children's Study

John Santelli, Gail Geller, Donna T. Chen, Marjorie A. Speers, Jeffrey R. Botkin, and Stacy Laswell


CASE DESCRIPTION

The Pregnant Minor Adolescent

Maria, a 16-year-old Hispanic female, is making her first prenatal visit to a university hospital clinic in California. At the first visit she receives a battery of clinical screenings, including blood and urine samples and a gynecological exam. She meets with a social worker, who asks her to complete a psychosocial risk assessment. These several assessments reveal that she is 18 weeks pregnant and in general good health. She has a history of a Chlamydia infection 1 year ago and states that she uses condoms, “but not always.” She reports that abortion is not an option for her because she could never “kill her baby.” She has recently stopped smoking. She is currently repeating 9th grade and getting Bs and Ds in school. She is living with her parents in an inner-city neighborhood with high rates of drug use and street violence. Her parents emigrated from Mexico 10 years ago. Maria reports that her father is “very angry” with her about getting pregnant. She initiated intercourse at age 14. She denies physical abuse by her family or her boyfriend Ramon, who is 18. Ramon hopes to join the Army and Maria hopes to finish school after the baby is born. During the course of this first prenatal care visit, the social worker asks if Maria would be interested in enrolling herself and her new baby in a longitudinal study of child health called the National Children's Study.

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