Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Social Security and Welfare

By Steven G. Livingston | Go to book overview

1

The Homestead Act of 1862

“Go West, young man, go forth into the Country.” Horace Greeley's words must rank among the most famous, and by now the most hackneyed, in American history. When written they were not merely an exhortation to the adventurous, they summed up one of the nation's first ideas for public assistance. It was the idea embodied in the Homestead Act of 1862, one of the United States' most celebrated pieces of legislation.

By the time of the act's repeal, in 1976, over 500,000 Americans had settled on over 80 million acres of public land under its provisions. It is central to the history of the American West. But its importance stretches further. Support for the act was an essential cement for the emerging Republican party in the 1850s, and the politics of its passage have been credited by both contemporaries and historians for the election of Abraham Lincoln.

The origins of the Homestead Act reach back to the Jacksonian era. Cheap public land always had a natural constituency: residents on the western frontier and all Americans who endorsed the Jeffersonian ideal of a country of sturdy yeomen working their own farms. America's original policy had been to offer its public lands for sale. But many farmers, and even state legislatures, began petitioning for “preemption,” the right to occupy the land first and pay for it later. Thomas Hart Benton, the Missouri senator and ally of Andrew Jackson, led the federal fight for such a policy, and finally obtained the Petition Act of 1841. This allowed a squatter (one who occupied a piece of land without having purchased it) to purchase the occupied land at the minimum government price. The politics

-11-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Social Security and Welfare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.