Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Social Security and Welfare

By Steven G. Livingston | Go to book overview

6

The Social Security Act
Amendments of 1939

By the end of the 1930s, Social Security had survived its toughest political tests. In 1936, Alf Landon, the GOP nominee for president, made opposition to the program a campaign theme in his effort to unseat President Roosevelt. Landon's crushing defeat demonstrated Social Security's popularity. A year later, the Supreme Court found the program to be constitutional.

Though it was now clear that the Social Security Act would survive, debate over the program did not end. Liberals continued to believe that Title II, the old-age insurance plan, was too stingy, while conservatives still worried about the fiscal impact of the entire enterprise. In 1939 these worries strangely combined to produce a major change in Social Security. Today, when one thinks of “Social Security,” one is actually thinking of the American old-age insurance program as recreated in 1939. In the 1935 act, the old-age insurance program was a reserve or annuity-style plan, a plan in which an individual received back, upon retirement, his or her own contributions plus interest. The 1939 Amendments began shifting the program to a “pay-as-you-go” plan, in which a retired individual's benefits were paid, not from his or her own taxes, but from the annual contributions of those currently in the workforce. The Amendments also added a survivors benefit to social security. In the 1935 program, a worker's benefits ended with his or her death. In 1939, this was changed to continue benefits, at a reduced level, to the worker's spouse or dependent children.

The 1935 act had given the Social Security Board the authority to offer recommendations for the improvement of the Social Se-

-59-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Student's Guide to Landmark Congressional Laws on Social Security and Welfare
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.