4
Applications of Rhetorical Narratology
to Aspects of Narrative

In the second and third chapters I provided a general approach to the analysis of narratives, concentrating on the structure of narrative transmission as defined primarily by audience positions (authorial and narrating audiences and narratees) and the voices that can be discerned or inferred (extrafictional voice, implied author, narrator, and focalizer). I have shown how relationships among these positions can be understood as offering to actual readers opportunities for identification, for ironic distance, and, in the case of a narrative that fails with a reader, for rejection. I have shown how a narrative's locutions must be understood within a context of illocutions that are constituted in the interaction between text and reader, are governed by four ur-conventions and the principle of hyperprotection, implicate messages from author to reader, and thus have a great deal to do with how a reader reacts to the narrative's ideology and “interprets” its theme. In short, I have shown how illocutionary acts can result in perlocutionary effects, as long as the situational context is one that allows the principles of relevance to operate.

My purpose in the present chapter is to refine this approach by applying it to four aspects of narrative that have especially interested narratologists over the past several decades: the relationship of plot and theme to narrative discourse, the gendering of narrating voices, the temporal structure of narratives, and the representation of both inner and voiced speech. (My exclusion of the topic of “character” may seem odd, but James Phelan, in Reading People, Reading Plots, has done a masterful job of placing character within a rhetorical context.) Having already touched on the first two aspects, I will begin with them.


Plot, Theme, and Narrating

Plot and theme are two of the elements of narrative most frequently discussed in introduction-to-literature textbooks, characterization

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rhetorical Narratology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures vii
  • 1: Introduction to Rhetorical Narratology and Speech-Act Theory 1
  • 2: Audience 47
  • 3: Narrating Voices and Their Audiences 81
  • 4: Applications of Rhetorical Narratology to Aspects of Narrative 125
  • 5: Narrative Transmission, Readers' Scripts, and Illocutionary Acts 162
  • Works Cited 191
  • Index 201
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 208

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.