Emancipation and Reconstruction

By Michael Perman | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS, SECOND EDITION

I am very pleased to have been asked to prepare a new edition of this book. The invitation was not only an acknowledgment that the book has been well received but a recognition that the historical episode it deals with continues to attract interest and stimulate significant schol- arly investigation.

Indeed, during the fourteen years since Emancipation and Re- construction first appeared, many new works on the period have emerged. Most of them have focused on Emancipation, so I have added a new section on “The Impact of Emancipation” as well as several segments presenting some of the recent scholarship. In the Reconstruction part of the book, the revisions mainly discuss new books or particular aspects of the era that have become more salient during the past decade.

In the process of revising and rewriting, I have been helped by several people. Most of all, Andrew Davidson, the publisher, read the entire manuscript and gave it a very careful and thoughtful editing. He raised valuable questions and made numerous suggestions. This degree of interest and involvement is hard to come by, and I am ex- tremely grateful to him for the clarifications and improvements that resulted. I received advice and encouragement from two other sources. My colleague in the UIC History Department, Daniel Scott Smith, read the first chapter and offered comments that I found most useful, while Michael Averbach, Head of the History Division at Oak Park–River Forest High School, gave the revised text a careful read- ing. Both of them should know how much I appreciate their generos- ity and help.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Emancipation and Reconstruction
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Foreword vii
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments, Second Edition xi
  • Acknowledgments, First Edition xiii
  • Introduction - Emancipation And Reconstruction in History 1
  • Chapter One - Shaping Emancipation, 1861–1870 6
  • Chapter Two - Planning Reconstruction, 1865 –1868 40
  • Chapter Three 73
  • Chapter Four - Ending Reconstruction, 1874–1879 103
  • Conclusion - The Dilemma Of Reconstruction 142
  • Bibliographical Essay 145
  • Index 163
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.