Uprooting Children: Mobility, Social Capital, and Mexican American Underachievement

By Robert Ketner Ream | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1

Introduction

The study of Latinos can only begin by charting unsuspected
encounters, with full awareness that the task is bound to find
unsuspected mirrors bound to reflect the researcher's
unguarded gaze
.

— Roman de la Campa, Latinos and the Crossover Aesthetic

Among the wide-ranging challenges facing American educators and the divergent theories and methods we employ to redress inadequacies in our educational system, perhaps no other issue is more pressing than the disparity in educational achievement among racial/ethnic groups.1 However it is measured, whether by school grades, standardized test scores, course selection, or high school and college completion rates, the fact that there is a persistent history of group-level achievement differences in American education is not debatable. Nevertheless, the reasons we give for this problem—as well as the theoretical presuppositions and research techniques on which many past explanations have been premised—can be strongly contested. This was dramatically illustrated by the explosive reaction to publication of Herrnstein and Murray's The Bell Curve (1994), which by linking genetic characteristics to group achievement differences marked the troubling re-emergence of a line of research most scholars in the field thought was obsolete. Herrnstein and Murray's thesis has been largely discredited by other works (Jencks, et al., 1972; Bowles & Gintis, 1972; Thompson, Detterman, & Plomin, 1991; Valencia & Solorzano, 1997; Jencks & Phillips, 1998) and debunked by “anti-essentialist” arguments (Loury, 2002), all of which leave little doubt that so-called innate differences between “races” are actually the shameful product of a long history of discriminatory political and cultural practices, as well as continued ethnocentric biases in the contemporary political and economic structures of American society (Du Bois, 1903; Wilson, 1987; Massey & Eggers, 1990; Kozol, 1992; Menchaca, 1995; Vernez & Abrahamse, 1996; Trueba, 1999; Valencia, 2002; Villenas & Foley, 2002; National Research Council, 2004). It is precisely because some

-1-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Uprooting Children: Mobility, Social Capital, and Mexican American Underachievement
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.