Leonardo Da Vinci: The Marvellous Works of Nature and Man

By Martin Kemp | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements, 1981 and 2006

I would wish in this, my first book worthy of the name, to acknowledge my indebtedness to those who have inculcated in me whatever grasp of the subject I now possess: to Professor Michael Jaffé of Cambridge who never allowed one to lose sight of the fact that art history is about works of art; to Professor John Shearman, formerly of the Courtauld Institute, who cajoled all his students to adopt more rigorous standards of historical analysis; to Professor Sir Ernst Gombrich of the Warburg Institute, who taught me directly only on one or two brief occasions, but whose example and encouragement have been a source of inspiration. It was Sir Ernst Gombrich's generous loan of a preliminary typescript of his paper on Leonardo's studies of water which was responsible for my embarking upon Leonardo studies in earnest. My earlier education in science was shaped at school by Dennis Clark, a remarkable teacher. That I subsequently failed to learn as much as I should from my scientific instructors at Cambridge was largely my fault not theirs. In my immediate post-student days, I owed the foundation of my career to Professor Anthony Blunt and to the late Professor Andrew McLaren Young. Professor McLaren Young of Glasgow University appointed me to my first established post and encouraged me in every way possible. His successor at Glasgow, Professor Ronald Pickvance, generously promoted and facilitated the sabbatical year without which this book would not have been completed when it was, if at all.

Warm thanks are due to the staff of those institutions in which I have pursued my studies over a number of years. The unique nature of the library of the Warburg Institute gave feasibility to my programme of research, and the unrivalled accessibility of its holdings saved more hours than I care to think of wasting. The Milanese libraries each made significant contributions in their different ways: the Biblioteca Ambrosiana, with its determinedly archaic air of punctiliousness; the Biblioteca Trivulziana within the efficient and friendly Archivio di Stato; and the Raccolta Vinciana, a working collection for students. Nearer home I have benefited enormously from the collection of Leonardo literature in the National Library of Scotland, presented in memory of the Rev. Alexander MacCurdy. Numerous individuals have made contributions to the furtherance of my research and publications on Leonardo and related topics in the Renaissance. If I specifically mention Professor James Ackerman, Michael Baxandall, Allan Braham, Cecil Clough, Caroline Elam, Robert Gibbs, Richard

-xxv-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Leonardo Da Vinci: The Marvellous Works of Nature and Man
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Praise for Martin Kemp's Leonardo ii
  • Leonardo Da Vinci iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Plates vii
  • List of Colour Plates xii
  • List of Figures xiii
  • Preface to the 1981 Edition xvii
  • Preface to This Edition xx
  • Acknowledgements, 1981 and 2006 xxv
  • Abbreviations and References xxviii
  • I - 'Leonardo Da Firenze' 1
  • II - The Microcosm 71
  • III - The Exercise of Fantasia 137
  • IV - The Republic: New Battles and Old Problems 204
  • V - The Prime Mover 271
  • Bibliography 349
  • Index 367
  • Photographic Acknowledgements 382
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 398

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.