Roots of the Classical: The Popular Origins of Western Music

By Peter Van Der Merwe | Go to book overview

Acknowledgements

As what the academic fraternity is pleased to call an 'amateur' scholar, I have contracted an especially large number of debts in writing this book. My thanks go to the following:

The Ernest Oppenheimer Memorial Trust, for financing a three-month stay at Wolfson College, Oxford in 1992 and a shorter trip to England four years later. Without the research undertaken on those two occasions, the factual support for my theories would be a great deal more rickety than it is.

The Natal Society Foundation Trust, for easing the final labours on this book with a generous grant.

Innumerable friends and acquaintances, for general encouragement and often also practical help. Most must remain nameless, but I should at least mention my colleagues at the Natal Society Library: Jane Bentley, Saragh McCrudden-Parfitt, Lois du Toit, and John Morrison, the last of whom gave expert advice on the delicate art of approaching official bodies.

Another colleague, Nomvula Kuzwayo, for transcribing, with her friend Ketsiwe Dlamini, the Swazi song quoted on page 40. Also Irina Guschina, for help with various bits of Russian, and Milada Pešek for translating the little Slovak song on page 34.

My friends in England: Rosemarie Finch, Nick Hollinghurst, Hubert and Shirley Elffers, and those fellow pioneers in the study of popular music, Wilfrid Mellers and Philip Tagg. All of them provided not only help and encouragement, but also accommodation. Also Tim Crawford, for lending me his copy of Joan Ambrosio Dalza's lute music, and the late Arthur Jacobs, for unfailing friendship and assistance.

Two American friends: Anatole Leikin, who provided invaluable information on octatonic scales, monotertial relationships, and other arcana of east European music, and Orly Krasner, whose letters have been a constant source of amusement and encouragement.

Finally, Bruce Phillips, head until 1998 of the Music Books Department at the Oxford University Press. At least for me, he was the ideal editor, endlessly patient

-vii-

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Roots of the Classical: The Popular Origins of Western Music
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents ix
  • List of Figures xi
  • A Note on Terminology and Notation xii
  • A Note on the Musical Examples xvi
  • Abbreviations xviii
  • Introduction 1
  • Part One - The Melodic Foundations 5
  • 1: The Subtle Mathematics of Music 7
  • 2: The Ramellian Paradigm 19
  • 3: The Children's Chant 27
  • 4: The Pentatonic Scale 38
  • Part Two - The Harmonic Revolution 51
  • 5: Primitive Harmony 53
  • 6: The Discovery of Tonality 66
  • 7: Rivals to Tonality 86
  • 8: Dissonance and Discord 106
  • 9: The Evolution of Tonality 116
  • Part Three - The Melodic Counter-Revolution 129
  • 10: The Rude, the Vulgar, and the Polite 131
  • 11: The Debt to the East 144
  • 12: The Dances of Central Europe 231
  • 13: The Nineteenth–century Vernacular 271
  • 14: Romanticism 339
  • 15: Modernism 376
  • 16: The Popular Style 426
  • Epilogue 461
  • List of Musical Examples 467
  • Glossary 485
  • Bibliography 502
  • Index 515
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