Christopher Marlowe: Poet and Spy

By Park Honan | Go to book overview

9

The keen pleasures of sex

Ah, words that make me surfeit with delight:
What greater bliss can hap…
Than live and be the favourite of a king?
Sweet prince, I come! these, these, thy amorous lines,
Might have enforced me to have swum from France,
And, like Leander, gasp'd upon the sand,
So thou wouldst smile and take me in thy arms.

(Gaveston, Edward II)


Shakespeare and new fields

NO spy or part-time agent who risks life and limb, and who then escapes from a dangerous, nerve-racking predicament is likely to be full of self-recrimination for long. And nothing suggests that Marlowe took pride in being a spy. His morale did not hinge on the technical failure of his stay on a Dutch island. After all, he had not really forfeited the Cecils' interest and protection. He had accustomed himself to duplicity, or the deception required in overseas work, or he could not have gone to Zeeland and survived. His nerve had not quite failed him, and after some weeks in London his optimism and self-esteem probably blotted out any sense of a lost chance. He was lucky to get back from Flushing without the loss of his ears: he had suffered no punishment after falling into the hands of the svelte, debonair, poetry-writing governor.

A dependency on secret work since his Cambridge days, though, had its drawback: he could not be sure of its continuance, or if he would ever be used again. No elegant, young, part-time spy had any such assurance; and there may have been difficulty in informing employers of

-285-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Christopher Marlowe: Poet and Spy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgements vii
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • A Note on Conventions Used in the Text xv
  • Introduction 1
  • I - A Canterbury Youth 7
  • 1: Birth 9
  • 2: Petty School and the Parish 18
  • 3: The King's School 39
  • II - Scholar and Spy 69
  • 4: Corpus Christi College, Cambridge 71
  • 5: Into Espionage 106
  • III - With Shakespeare, Kyd, and the Ralegh Circle 157
  • 6: The Tamburlaine Phenomenon 159
  • 7: Doctor Faustus 197
  • 8: A Spy Abroad 241
  • IV - Sexuality and Reckonings 283
  • 9: The Keen Pleasures of Sex 285
  • 10: A Little Matter of Murder 321
  • Epilogue 361
  • Appendices 369
  • Notes 383
  • Index 405
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 421

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.