African American Family Life: Ecological and Cultural Diversity

By Vonnie C. McLoyd; Nancy E. Hill et al. | Go to book overview

Series Editors' Note

This volume is the third in the Duke Series in Child Development and Public Policy, an ongoing collection of edited volumes that address the translation of research in child development to contemporary issues in public policy. The goal of the series is to bring cutting-edge research and theory in the vibrant field of child development to bear on problems facing children and families in contemporary society.

This series grew out of interactions among faculty members at the Duke Center for Child and Family Policy in the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy and the Duke Department of Psychology: Social and Health Sciences. With generous support from the Duke Provost's Initiative in the Social Sciences, we began to plan an annual series of working conferences, each of which would lead to an edited volume.

Each conference brings together scholars from diverse disciplines, along with a participant audience of over 100 scientists, students, policymakers, and practitioners, who wrestle with a problem in contemporary society. Because each conference is defined by a broad current problem or issue, scholars are forced to depart from their silos of disciplinary-based theories and methods in order to address the practice and policy issues that are germane to a particular problem. The solutions to vexing contemporary problems require the best efforts of multiple disciplines working together.

The first volume in the series—Aggression, Antisocial Behavior, and Violence among Girls, edited by Martha Putallaz and Karen L. Bierman— challenges myths about girls' aggressive behavior, provides important new findings, and guides future research as well as policy. The second volume—Enhancing Early Attachments, edited by Lisa J. Berlin, Yair Ziv, Lisa Amaya-Jackson, and Mark T. Greenberg—addresses interventions for problems in the parent–infant attachment relationship. Practitioners, developmental scientists, and policymakers have recently recognized the

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