The Psychology of Religious Fundamentalism

By Ralph W. Hood, Jr.; Peter C. Hill et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER THREE
The History of Protestant Fundamentalism1

Liberals blame 'Fundamentalists' for not being Liberals;
sacramentalists [blame them] for not being sacramentalists;
[the] neo-orthodox [blame them] for not being neo-
orthodox; and so on. The limitation of this kind of
criticism is clear. It tells us, in terms of some other system,
what 'Fundamentalism' is not, without telling us—often,
indeed, without even asking—what 'Fundamentalism' is in
terms of itself. Consequently, these accounts do not touch
the heart of the matter; for 'Fundamentalism' is something
quite different from these other systems, and can be
understood only in terms of its own first principles.

—PACKER (1958, p. 11)

The intratextual model of fundamentalism stresses that common psychological and sociological dynamics are at work, regardless of context. The idea that there are parallels among movements across religious traditions is a logical extension of the intratextual model, and applying the model to various traditions both within American Protestantism (Pentecostals, serpent handlers, the Amish) and outside Protestantism (Islam) is our aim in Chapters 4–7. However, it is also true that we must consider the unique historical and social context for a complete understanding of fundamentalism, and we devote this chapter to these considerations.

The term “fundamentalism” is used here to describe a particular movement within American Protestantism that was formed in the early 20th century, though Protestant fundamentalists themselves claim that their movement is simply an extension of historic Christianity and a continuation of the 19th-century American religious consensus. Protestant fundamentalism still carries marks of its unique historical development

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Psychology of Religious Fundamentalism
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 247

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.