Changing Anarchism: Anarchist Theory and Practice in a Global Age

By Jonathan Purkis; James Bowen | Go to book overview

Glossary

Alternative Globalisation Movement (AGM) A general term, used in preference to 'anti-globalisation', for the diverse network of largely autonomous groups who have contested the neoliberal economic and political agendas of the world's leading industrial powers and corporations since the early 1990s. Often believed to have emerged at the World Trade Organisation summit in Seattle, United States, November 1999, the movement's roots lie in the reaction to the impact of the North American Free Trade Agreement, particularly on the Zapatistas in the Chiapas area of Mexico, in 1994. The AGM includes farming groups, campaigners against debt, squatters, indigenous peoples organisations as well as high-profile Western groups such as Reclaim the Streets, Tute Bianche, Globalise Resistance and Black Block.

Anarcho-communism Arguably the most enduring strand of anarchism, closely associated with the struggles of European and Russian movements in the nineteenth and early twentieth century in particular, as well as writers such as Kropotkin, Proudhon, Bakunin. Particularly strong in Britain in the post-World War II era. Some debate exists as to the extent of its close relationship with anarcho-collectivism.

Anarcho-individualism A philosophy based on the premise that the individual should attempt to minimise the way that authority impacts on them personally in pursuit of freedom. Culturally strong in the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, it sometimes draws right- as well as left-wing anarchists to it. Most famously advocated by the writings of Max Stirner, it is often seen to be a somewhat self-indulgent form of anarchism, but continues to have many followers.

Anarcho-primitivism (see Perlman, Zerzan) A critique of civilisation, initially based on the work of Perlman, which synthesises an advanced analysis of the existing forms of power within society with a re-evaluation of the concept of the 'primitive'. Increasingly highly regarded among some anarchists and publications (Green Anarchist in Britain, Fifth Estate in the United States), it has also

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