Sisters in the Struggle: African American Women in the Civil Rights-Black Power Movement

By Bettye Collier-Thomas; V. P. Franklin | Go to book overview

Index
Abernathy, Ralph David, 66, 69, 70, 74
ABWH. See Association of Black Women Historians
ACCA. See Atlanta Committee for Cooperative Action
Adams, Malika, 245
AFDC. See Aid to Families with Dependent Children
African Americans: attitudes toward women in politics, 311–12; and philanthropy, 83; and political participation, multiple models of, 318–19; poverty among, 185
African American women: activists, marginalization of, 121, 188–89; and black counterpublic, 319; black nationalism and, 293, 316; in Black Panther Party, 234, 243–47, 248–49, 316; in Black Power Movement, 171–73, 207; and Black Power Movement, frustration with, 288; blame on, 250; in Civil Rights Movement, 9–10, 60, 211; color hierarchy and, 220–21; electoral success of, reasons for, 310–15; faith connection of, 129–30, 136; feminist consciousness of, 60; and feminist organizing, 237–38, 280–301; and grassroots leadership, 96–97, 112, 115–16; in Kennedy Commission, 281, 285–86; in leadership positions, 93, 175, 188; and Malcolm X, appeal of, 214–15, 223–24; in military, 30–31; in MFDP, 125–33, 135–36; in NOW, 286–87; and patriarchy, 216; political ambitions of, 313; and protection, promise of, 215–19; in public service, 12, 32, 258, 306–27; in quest for equality, 89; sisterhood among, development of, 257, 267–68; in SNCC, 204–5; subjectivity of, 139; violence against, 153–54, 298–99; vs. white women, as percentage of elected officials, 309–10; and womanhood, exclusion from, 244. See also specific women
African women, experiences in New World, 1–2
Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC), 285
AKA. See Alpha Kappa Alpha
Alabama: Montgomery Bus Boycott, 43, 59, 61–74; NAACP in, 69
Alexander, Margaret Walker, 224
Alexander, Sadie T. M., 34, 73
ALFA. See Alliance of Lesbian Feminists of Atlanta
Allen, Elizabeth, 160
Allen, Louis, 160
Alliance of Lesbian Feminists of Atlanta (ALFA), 273
Alligood, Clarence, 259–60, 264
Alpha Kappa Alpha (AKA), 28, 320; and civil rights activism, 28–29, 37, 38; and Mississippi Health Project, 28; Non-Partisan Council on Public Affairs, 28, 31, 32; “Recommendations for Peace,” 31–32; and Summer School for Rural Negro Teachers, 28; during World War II, 29–31
Alpha Phi Alpha, 320
American Council on Human Rights, 32, 37
Angelou, Maya, 310
anger: Fannie Lou Hamer and, 142, 161; as personal power, 140
antilynching campaign, 34; GavaganWagner-Van Nuys bill, 22; New Jersey State Federation of Colored Women's Clubs and, 23–24
Archie-Hudson, Margaret, 306, 317
armed services. See military

-349-

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