Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells, Understanding Crime, Law, and Morality in America

By John Dombrink; Daniel Hillyard | Go to book overview

4
4
Gay Rights
Beyond Tolerance and Privacy to Equality

It's not gonna be that way.

—Ennis Del Mar in Brokeback Mountain (2005)

It's time we learn from our mistakes and acknowledge that lesbian
and gay Americans… speak the vocabulary of marriage, live the
personal commitment of marriage, do the hard work of marriage,
and share the responsibilities we associate with marriage. It's time
to allow them the same freedom every other American has—the
freedom to marry.

—Evan Wolfson, Why Marriage Matters (2004)

Your children and grandchildren will be taught that homosexuality
is normal and same-sex unions equally valid to heterosexual mar-
riages. So-called “hate crimes” laws will make sure that anyone
who objects is silenced.

—Gary Bauer, American Values

Who cares?

—Billy Crystal's Aunt Sheila, referring to the imminent marriage
of her daughter and another woman, as told in his play
700 Sundays (Billy Crystal 700 Sundays, 2006)


Wedding Day in San Francisco

San Francisco has long been regarded as one of America's most liberal cities, so it was little surprise that it was there that the gay marriage debate was turned up a notch in February 2004. Newly elected mayor Gavin Newsom, the favored successor of the popular mayor and former state assembly speaker Willie Brown, and most of the Democratic

-93-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells, Understanding Crime, Law, and Morality in America
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 331

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.