Sin No More: From Abortion to Stem Cells, Understanding Crime, Law, and Morality in America

By John Dombrink; Daniel Hillyard | Go to book overview

6
Stem Cells
Framing Battles and the Race for a Cure

I have never seen in my career a biological tool as powerful as the
stem cells. It addresses every single human disease.

—Dr. Hans Keirstad, 60 Minutes (2006)

Prop 71 was a thinly veiled, and successful attempt by scientists,
actors, and some members of the media to create a constitutional
right to embryonic stem cell research and human cloning. One of
the most disturbing parts of Prop 71 is the fact that it allows for
the cloning of human beings to be used for destructive embryonic
stem cell research.

—Diane Vargo, “Connecting the Dots: Stem Cells and
Human Cloning” (2005)

I just don't see how we can turn our backs on this.… We have
lost so much time already.… [Stem cell research] may provide our
scientists with many answers that for so long have been beyond
our grasp.

—Nancy Reagan (2004)


A State Steps Forward

In 2006, one American state battled to consider an emerging scientific policy direction over which many in the country were conflicted. The issue was the state funding of stem cell research, important because the Bush administration in 2001 had blocked the use of federal funds for research on the promising scientific development, on the grounds that destruction of embryos, a central concern of the pro-life movement, was necessary for stem cell research advances.

In one television advertisement produced and run by the reformers, a

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