Making Political Science Matter: Debating Knowledge, Research, and Method

By Sanford F. Schram; Brian Caterino | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The editors want to thank all the contributors for working with us to produce this book. Everyone was so cooperative. It has been a pleasure working with all those involved. Further, we want to thank Dvora Yanow for providing both sound advice and the title for the book, which she developed originally for a conference panel on the significance of Bent Flyvbjerg's Making Social Science Matter.

This book was started as a project that was hatched in discussions with Dvora and Patrick Thaddeus Jackson. Discussions with many others helped shaped the outline of the manuscript. In particular, we want to thank Fred Block, Barbara Cruikshank, Anne Dalke, Richard Fording, Chuck Green, Jack Gunnell, Bonnie Honig, Ken Hoover, Anne Norton, Ido Oren, Stephen Pimpare, Frances Fox Piven, Michael Shapiro, Rogers Smith, Joe Soss, and Keith Topper. In addition, we thank students in Sanford Schram's social theory seminar for offering ideas that help informed his thinking on the project: Page Buck, Wesley Bryant, Angie Campbell, To m Duffin, Christine Hitchens, Linda Houser, Anchana Jetti, Gail Manza, Michael Pfeiffer, Sarah Podolin, Jennifer Stotter, and Tracey Uhl. We especially want to thank the anonymous reviewers recruited by New York University Press who engaged us effectively to improve the manuscript. Thanks are also due our great editor, Ilene Kalish, editorial assistant Salwa Jabado, and Despina Papazoglou Gimbel, managing editor, from the Press, who all worked methodically and judiciously to bring the book to publication. Last, we appreciate the permission from the following journals to reprint articles as chapters: Politics & Society, for the chapters by David Laitin and Bent Flyvbjerg; Inquiry, for the chapter by Theodore Schatzki; and Political Theory, for the chapter by Sanford Schram.

-vii-

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