A Half-Century of Greatness: The Creative Imagination of Europe, 1848-1884

By Frederic Ewen; Jeffrey Wollock | Go to book overview

Chapter Three
Thomas Carlyle
Out of the “Nay” into the “Everlasting Yea”

Un peuple qui nest pas heureux, n'a pas de patrie.

A people that is not happy has no fatherland.

—Saint-Just, 1792

What Act of Legislature was there that thou shouldst be
Happy? A little while ago thou hadst no right to be at all.
What if thou wert born and pre-destined not to be
Happy, but to be Unhappy! Art thou nothing other than
a Vulture, then, that fliest through the Universe seeking
somewhat to eat; and shrieking dolefully because carrion
enough is not given thee? Close thy Byron; open thy
Goethe! …

—Thomas Carlyle

Amidst the clamors of protest, adjuration, warning and counsel, and the turmoils accompanying popular agitation for reform, there was also one voice that forcefully penetrated to the ears of the generation of the 1830s and the 1840s. It was the voice of a Scotsman who in June 1834 settled in London, and established himself at an address destined to become a celebrated landmark. Thomas Carlyle and his wife, Jane Welsh Carlyle, accompanied by their maid Bessie Barnett and a canary, took a lease on a house at 5, Cheyne Row, Chelsea. He was then approaching thirty—a tall, robust, large-boned man, shaggy-browed, with deeply-piercing eyes—a man of loud, raucous speech and laughter, and a writer with an unbridled, turbulent literary style that despite its “wildness” somehow fastened itself on the mind and the imagination of readers. Here was to be found the storm of the times articulate, the formal bonds of traditional speech broken into apostrophes, adjurations, personalia, and not least, into insights and perceptions that cast a new light on the times' needs. Jane Welsh was neither writer nor prophet, but she was highly intelligent and very beautiful—she was keen-minded and deep-feeling and brave. She had defied conventions, for as the daughter of a well-to-do physician who had left her extensive property, she had married a struggling writer, erstwhile teacher and candidate for the ministry, and ventured with him on a very hazardous future. He had been her tutor, and they had fallen in love.

-20-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Half-Century of Greatness: The Creative Imagination of Europe, 1848-1884
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 572

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.