A Half-Century of Greatness: The Creative Imagination of Europe, 1848-1884

By Frederic Ewen; Jeffrey Wollock | Go to book overview

Chapter Four
Charles Dickens
The Novel in “The Battle of Life”

“I believe” … said Alfred, “there are victories and strug-
gles, great sacrifices of self, and noble acts of heroism …
not less difficult to achieve, because they have no earthly
chronicle or audience—done every day in nooks and
corners, and in little households, and in men's and
women's hearts—any one of which might reconcile the
sternest man to such a world, and fill him with belief
and hope in it, though three-fourths of its people were at
war, and another fourth at law, and that's a bold word.”
—Charles Dickens, “The Battle of Life”

“The Child is father of the Man.”

—William Wordsworth, “My Heart Leaps Up”

The year is 1833—an embattled year, as we have seen, rampant with auguries, good and evil, for the state of England, battered by conflicting winds of doctrine and threats of violence, even though the Great Reform Bill had been passed the year before. Disenchantment was already setting in, as the greater mass of England's population was still left disfranchised. An anonymous ballad of the day expressed the feelings of the working classes:

'Tis twelve months past, just yesterday, since earth and sky and sea
And rock and glen and horse and men rang loud with jubilee;
The beacons blazed, and cannons fired, and roared each plain and hill
With the Bill—the glorious Bill and nothing but the Bill!

But each now holds his hands up in horror and disgust
At this same document—once termed the people's trust
That at last was to bring grist to all the nation's mill.
Oh, curse the Bill, ye rogues, the Bill, and nothing but the Bill! …1

On a December day in 1833, a young man strolling through the Strand there bought a copy of the Monthly Magazine. Through tear-stained eyes he saw his first published work—unsigned, but unmistakably there! Though unsupported by any form of remuneration, the experience was undoubtedly one familiar to many a writer whose firstling effort appears in print, an event thereafter held second only to one's

-42-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
A Half-Century of Greatness: The Creative Imagination of Europe, 1848-1884
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 572

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.