A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership

By Ralph J. Bunche; Jonathan Scott Holloway | Go to book overview

I must also give thanks to my father for the way that he exposed me to the world of politics from an early age. I remember (only with an adult fondness) being dragged along to various meetings or receptions on Capitol Hill. I can still feel the pride when I impressed him with my knowledge, thanks to Schoolhouse Rock, of how a bill became a law. I certainly recall being corrected for failing to include the nonvoting delegates to the House of Representatives when I confidently answered that there were 535 members of Congress. And while I still think that it was silly to expect that kind of refined knowledge of a nine-year-old, I do appreciate that my abiding interest in the practice and performance of politics stems from my interactions with my father.

This project, of course, did not emerge wholly from these deep wells of recollection. Rather, the hard work and generosity of many people helped me at every juncture. Octavio Olvera from UCLA's Charles E. Young Research Library Department of Special Collections reproduced the entire carbon-copy manuscript for me (Ralph J. Bunche Papers, Collection 2051, Box 80). That could not have been fun. Simon Elliott, also of UCLA, greatly facilitated the reproduction of a number of the images that you find in the book. Closer to home, Janet Giarratano transcribed the photocopied manuscript. This had to be much less fun, and her interpretive skills in this task are to be admired. Shana Redmond provided critical background research and was an effective sounding board throughout the process. Nilofar Gardezi was my Los Angeles–based quality-control expert. Her ready assistance and sharp archival eye are deeply appreciated. Erin Wood saved me from making numerous mistakes when she served as my second set of eyes during the proofreading process.

At the eleventh hour I enjoyed the opportunity to present some of this work at Northwestern University. Comments and questions that followed my lecture proved to be immensely valuable. In this regard I must thank Dwight McBride, Robert Gooding-Williams, Nancy MacLean, Martha Biondi, and Jeffrey McCune for their contributions.

At the eleventh hour and fifty-ninth minute, I received critical assistance from Nancy Kuhl and John Monahan at Yale's Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library, David Haberstich at the Smithsonian Institution's Archive Center in the National Museum of American History, and Jeff Bridges of the Photographs and Prints Division at the Library of Congress. Hats off to all of them.

-x-

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A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Note on Editorial Policy and Formatting xiii
  • 1: A General Survey of Negro Leadership 39
  • 2 64
  • 3: Life Histories Analysis 156
  • 4: Leadership Schedules 190
  • 5: Conclusion 194
  • Index 225
  • About the Author and the Editor 229
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