A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership

By Ralph J. Bunche; Jonathan Scott Holloway | Go to book overview

Note on Editorial Policy
and Formatting

“A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership” was a rough draft that Bunche cobbled together from interview transcripts, old lecture notes, public talks, and fresh, but raw, commentary. Given this amalgamation and the pace of its production, the memo is fairly littered with typographical errors. These have been corrected for publication.

There are a number of sections in the memo that present ethnographic material on race leadership via field notes. These notes were inconsistently formatted, at times leaving readers to fend for themselves if they wanted to decipher whose voice was speaking at a particular moment. I have changed the presentation of these interviews so that they now share the same format. I have also inserted asterisks (* * * *) between interviews or field notes to clarify a change of speaker and/or interview subject. Bunche often declined to identify certain interview subjects. I decided to adhere to Bunche's decision in these cases rather than to conduct timeconsuming investigations that would yield, at best, a name. Elsewhere, Bunche mentioned prominent leaders in passing or only by their last name. I presume Bunche paid fleeting attention to these details, knowing that they would be addressed if and when the memo became incorporated into An American Dilemma. Where I felt that more biographical detail was merited, I annotated the text via endnotes that follow the memorandum. Some clarifications of vernacular are also found in these endnotes.

Finally, despite the best efforts of the transcriber, a research assistant, and several other people, there remains a handful of instances where the memo's text is either indecipherable or clearly missing a word. I have exercised an editor's prerogative and have introduced my own best guess at the proper language. My interpretations are found in brackets. Even in light of these various editorial changes, the content of the memo remains unchanged.

-xiii-

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A Brief and Tentative Analysis of Negro Leadership
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Note on Editorial Policy and Formatting xiii
  • 1: A General Survey of Negro Leadership 39
  • 2 64
  • 3: Life Histories Analysis 156
  • 4: Leadership Schedules 190
  • 5: Conclusion 194
  • Index 225
  • About the Author and the Editor 229
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