Dark Side of the Moon: The Magnificent Madness of the American Lunar Quest

By Gerard J. Degroot | Go to book overview

Preface

A funny thing happened on my way to Tranquillity Base. I suppose I could call it a revelation. This book, provisionally titled One Giant Leap, was originally intended as an antidote to my last book, The Bomb: A Life. Writing about nuclear weapons left me depressed, cynical, forlorn, and scared. After that experience, I craved something hopeful and uplifting and therefore looked to my childhood for a good wholesome story to retell. I decided to write a book about the heroes of my youth—the astronauts who took America to the Moon. I suppose that's self-indulgent, but I didn't care. I'd earned it after doing time with the Bomb.

When I started looking at the lunar program, I found heroes aplenty. But I also found a gang of cynics, manipulators, demagogues, tyrants, and even a few criminals. I discovered scheming politicians who amassed enormous power by playing on the public fascination for space and the fear of what the Russians might do there. Quite a few people got rich from the lunar mission; some got very rich indeed. The Moon mission was sold as a race that America could not afford to lose— a struggle for survival. Landing on the Moon, it was argued, would bring enormous benefit to all mankind. It would be good for the economy, for politics, and for the soul. It would, some argued, even end war.

Referring to the shallow nature of the Apollo 11 coverage on television and in newspapers, Edwin Diamond, a senior editor at Newsweek, wrote, a short time after the launch:

Little of the flesh and blood vitality—and human frailties—of the past
decade of the American space venture were offered. … Among the
missing stories, to take only the most obvious examples, were the Cold
War beginnings of the space program; John F. Kennedy's search for a
space spectacular “that the U.S. could win”; the spurious nature of the
“Moon race” with the Russians (we raced only ourselves); the separate
fiefdoms and the abrasive clash of personalities in NASA; the
logrolling politics of space appropriations and decisions that put the

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dark Side of the Moon: The Magnificent Madness of the American Lunar Quest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1: Fly Me to the Moons 1
  • 2: Slaves to a Dream 12
  • 3: What Are We Waiting For? 29
  • 4: Sputnik 45
  • 5: The Red Rocket's Glare 61
  • 6: Muttnik 79
  • 7: Rocket Jocks 100
  • 8: Before This Decade is Out 121
  • 9: The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters 153
  • 10: Lost in Space 183
  • 11: Sacrifices on the Altar of St. John 205
  • 12: Merry Christmas from the Moon 223
  • 13: Magnificent Desolation 233
  • 14: Nothing Left to Do 255
  • Notes 271
  • Bibliography 289
  • Index 293
  • About the Author 321
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.