Dark Side of the Moon: The Magnificent Madness of the American Lunar Quest

By Gerard J. Degroot | Go to book overview

11
Sacrifices on the Altar of St. John

Roy Neal, the former NBC reporter who covered NASA from the early days of Mercury through the space shuttle, once revealed that the first astronauts were all required to give an “obit” interview to be played in the event they were killed in the line of duty. The standard message went: “Exploring space is a dangerous business and lives will be lost. I am not afraid to die doing what I love, nor should my death in any way cause delays in the conquest of space.” Glenn, Cooper, Schirra and Shepard all performed the mandatory duty.

So too did Gus Grissom. Since the men were stating what they believed, the task was easy. During the first week of January 1967, Grissom reiterated those thoughts when he told a reporter: “We're in a risky business, and we hope if anything happens to us, it will not delay the program. The conquest of space is worth the risk of life. … Our Godgiven curiosity will force us to go there ourselves because in the final analysis only man can fully evaluate the Moon in terms understandable to other men.”1 He then went back to the preparations for the first flight of Apollo.

Despite occasional glitches, Gemini had gone well. Kennedy's goal seemed reachable, perhaps even with time to spare. The first Apollo missions, like Gemini, would test the equipment and maneuvers essential for a trip to the Moon. Apollo 1, with its crew of Grissom, Ed White, and Roger Chaffee, was supposed to be the first field test of the new vehicle. It would spend two weeks in space, monitor all the functions, and then test its ability to withstand reentry. Launch was scheduled for February 21, 1967.

From the start things did not go well. Development was proceeding at the same time as training, with the result that a delay in one automatically implied a delay in the other. Contractors found it difficult keeping to NASA's rigorous schedule. Apollo was so hugely complex that the astronauts spent week after week going over the systems again and again. Grissom, White, and Chaffee, along with the backup crew of

-205-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Dark Side of the Moon: The Magnificent Madness of the American Lunar Quest
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Preface xi
  • 1: Fly Me to the Moons 1
  • 2: Slaves to a Dream 12
  • 3: What Are We Waiting For? 29
  • 4: Sputnik 45
  • 5: The Red Rocket's Glare 61
  • 6: Muttnik 79
  • 7: Rocket Jocks 100
  • 8: Before This Decade is Out 121
  • 9: The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters 153
  • 10: Lost in Space 183
  • 11: Sacrifices on the Altar of St. John 205
  • 12: Merry Christmas from the Moon 223
  • 13: Magnificent Desolation 233
  • 14: Nothing Left to Do 255
  • Notes 271
  • Bibliography 289
  • Index 293
  • About the Author 321
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 322

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.