American Exceptionalism and Human Rights

By Michael Ignatieff | Go to book overview

Chapter 4
Why Does the American Constitution Lack
Social and Economic Guarantees?

CASS R. SUNSTEIN

The alms given to a naked man in the street do not fulfill the obliga-
tions of the state, which owes to every citizen a certain subsistence,
a proper nourishment, convenient clothing, and a kind of life not
incompatible with health.

—Montesquieu

This Republic had its beginning, and grew to its present strength,
under the protection of certain inalienable rights—among them the
right of free speech, free press, free worship, trial by jury, freedom
from unreasonable searches. They were our rights to life and liberty.

As our economy has grown in size and stature, however—as our
industrial economy expanded—these political rights proved inade-
quate to assure us equality in the pursuit of happiness. … We have
accepted, so to speak, a second Bill of Rights under which a new
basis of security and prosperity can be established for all—regardless
of station, race, or creed,

The right to a useful and remunerative job in the industries or
shops or farms or mines of the Nation;

The right to earn enough to provide adequate food and clothing
and recreation;

The right of every farmer to raise and sell his products at a return
which will give him and his family a decent living;

The right of every businessman, large and small, to trade in an
atmosphere of freedom from unfair competition and domination by
monopolies at home or abroad;

The right of every family to a decent home;

The right to adequate medical care and the opportunity to achieve
and enjoy good health;

The right to adequate protection from the economic fears of old
age, sickness, accident, and unemployment;

The right to a good education.

I ask Congress to explore the means for implementing this eco-
nomic bill of rights—for it is definitely the responsibility of the
Congress to do so.

—Franklin Delano Roosevelt

-90-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Exceptionalism and Human Rights
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 353

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.