The Student Loan Scam: The Most Oppressive Debt in U.S. History, and How We Can Fight Back

By Alan Collinge | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
Solutions

Citizens, student advocacy groups, and states' attorneys general have begun to make it clear that monumental changes are critically needed for student loans, and Congress is beginning to respond. Widespread publicity showing how standard consumer protections were removed from student loans, how banks and universities actively engaged in improper and exploitive relationships with lenders and students for the sake of monetary gain, and how student loan debt has affected the U.S. population has changed the national discourse on the subject. The rhetoric on Capitol Hill has finally turned to favor the consumers, not the banks, and the average citizen is now aware that this type of debt has serious, grave implications.

Since 2006, significant student loan legislation has been introduced, and some notable improvements have even been signed into law by President Bush. This is an encouraging first step. Make no mistake, however: thus far, legislation proposed for the reinstatement of standard consumer protections for student loans has not progressed anywhere close to the point of being signed into law, and indeed much of it has stalled or been abandoned. Student loans still remain absent of standard consumer protections, but at least the groundwork has been laid for the future. Even Sallie Mae representatives have stated publicly,

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Student Loan Scam: The Most Oppressive Debt in U.S. History, and How We Can Fight Back
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 168

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.