Lost and Found in Translation: Contemporary Ethnic American Writing and the Politics of Language Diversity

By Martha J. Cutter | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

I MUST BEGIN by thanking my students at Kent State University who have for several years now been listening to me discuss my passionate obsession with the theme of translation in ethnic American literature. More to the point, they have often pointed out textual nuances I had not noticed, and this book would not have been what it is without their insights.

I also owe a large debt of gratitude to Françoise MassardierKenney and Fanny Arango-Keeth for allowing me to audit their translation theory seminar in the Department of Modern and Classical Language Studies at Kent State University. Françoise and Fanny generously listened to my ideas and shared their expertise with me in a way that gave real meaning to the term “community of scholars.” I also thank Carol Maier for discussion of my ideas about Malinche, who plays a role in Chapter 5. Tim Morris offered helpful feedback on the introduction and general enthusiasm for the project. I am indebted to Betsy Huang for her thoughts on the role of translation in Chinese American literature and to Debby Rosenthal for helping me revise Chapter 5 on Chicano/a literature. Peter Ibarra discussed with me many of my ideas on Chicano/a literature and language and helped with some of the translations in Chapter 5. Terry Rowden's feedback on Chapter 4 and on the introduction and his general enthusiasm for the project have also been invaluable; I thank Terry as well for recommending that I read Derrida's Monolingualism of the Other, which plays a pivotal role in this book's conclusion. I thank Florence Dore for asking me some pointed questions about the project and for help in formulating my revision response letter. Tom Hines provided valuable suggestions about the title and about publishers. Werner Sollors, Bonnie TuSmith, and Keith Byerman also offered warm support for the proj

-vii-

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