American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment

By Sasha Abramsky | Go to book overview

INTRODUCTION
FROM OUT OF TARTARUS

Moundsville, West Virginia, is a sleepy little town deep in the heart of Appalachia, a ninety-minute drive south of Pittsburgh. The otherwise drab town center is dominated by the crumbling but still formidable visage of the old state penitentiary. Since the mid-1990s, when a new prison was built, the town has hosted an annual Mock Prison Riot, run by the federal Office of Law Enforcement Technology Commercialization and actively supported by West Virginia's congressional representatives, in the dank nineteenth-century penitentiary. Spanning several spring days inside the abandoned cellblocks, common areas, and yard, the mock riot has become a fixture on the social calendar of corrections aficionados from around the world.

“Freeze! Don't move!” Enforcement Technology Group (ETG) sales rep Aaron Dexter barks into an electronic gadget perched in front of him on the central lawn of the old prison, in April 2005. Immediately the public-address system translates the commands into Arabic, the harsh staccato voice amplified as it reverberates off the prison's massive turreted stone walls.

Clad in a T-shirt and gray slacks, the slightly bald Dexter keeps feeding in commands, and the PA system keeps broadcasting them across the yard in different languages. The hundreds of onlookers—mainly prison employees who have driven or flown in from around the country, many shivering in the damp early spring of Appalachia—applaud.

The command-translation machines were developed, Dexter informs me, with funding from DARPA (Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency), the shadowy Defense Department organization that has, over the decades, provided seed money for everything from the Internet to state-of-the-art biometric devices to bioweapons-detection technology. They were originally designed to control captured insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan, as well as terrorist suspects in Guantánamo Bay. In all possibility, the brutalized prisoners who turned up in photographs from Abu Ghraib in 2004, some hooded and with electric wires attached to parts of their bodies, others being set upon by attack dogs, others bruised and bloodied from beatings, and still others naked and, under duress, performing various sexual acts, had at times during

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - From Out of Tartarus ix
  • Part One - A Mindset Molded 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Holy Experiment 3
  • Chapter 2 - A Rising Tide of Violence 23
  • Chapter 3 - Using a Sledgehammer to Kill a Gnat 43
  • Chapter 4 - Victims, Fundamentalists, and Rant-Radio Hacks 59
  • Chapter 5 - Reductio Ad Absurdum 73
  • Part Two - Populating Bedlam 89
  • Chapter 6 - Open for Business 91
  • Chapter 7 - Till the End of Time 107
  • Chapter 8 - Storehouses of the Living Dead 129
  • Chapter 9 - Adult Time 153
  • Conclusion 169
  • Acknowledgments 179
  • Notes 181
  • Selected Bibliography 199
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.