American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment

By Sasha Abramsky | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
REDUCTIO AD ABSURDUM

At 7:35 a.m., after eating their breakfast rations—inedible-looking low-grade salami, bologna, ham, and turkey sandwiches, a cracker, some milk, and a small piece of fruit—the fifteen women of the Maricopa County Jail chain gang shuffle off the bus, tethered in groups of five. It's a routine they're used to: the bus, emblazoned with the words “Sheriff's Chain Gang,” presumably so that drivers on the interstate know exactly what their sheriff is spending their money on, brings them the twenty miles west on I-10 from the main jail in Phoenix several times a month. Slowly, they head toward the blue portable toilet at the edge of the county's unromantically named White Tanks cemetery for paupers.

One at a time, the women step into the plastic room, the chain trailing off their ankle and through the door, keeping it from fully closing. The rest of the crew stand clustered a couple feet back; every bodily noise emanating from the chamber is audible. “If we start thinking they're taking too long,” explains Officer J. C. Hale, the ever jovial supervisor of the female chain gang, who spent the breakfast hour telling his charges about his recent trip to Mexico, “we say, 'Come on! Hurry up!' ”

Inside, someone has etched into the plastic toilet-paper holder a lone cry of protest: “Fuck off.” There doesn't seem to be much else to say.

Fifteen minutes after the crapping-and-pissing expedition began, the prisoners are lined up in three columns of five, and begin their slow march around the chain-link fence perimeter of the cemetery's arid expanse. At 8:07 they arrive at the far corner to greet the contents of the green minivan, driven by a large African American mortician, and another hearse, which has just pulled up. Inside the vehicles are stacked, like boxes of produce, four shapeless blue chipboard coffins. The women stand still, facing a row of open graves cut into the dry, orange-brown Arizona earth. Behind them are four huge concrete

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - From Out of Tartarus ix
  • Part One - A Mindset Molded 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Holy Experiment 3
  • Chapter 2 - A Rising Tide of Violence 23
  • Chapter 3 - Using a Sledgehammer to Kill a Gnat 43
  • Chapter 4 - Victims, Fundamentalists, and Rant-Radio Hacks 59
  • Chapter 5 - Reductio Ad Absurdum 73
  • Part Two - Populating Bedlam 89
  • Chapter 6 - Open for Business 91
  • Chapter 7 - Till the End of Time 107
  • Chapter 8 - Storehouses of the Living Dead 129
  • Chapter 9 - Adult Time 153
  • Conclusion 169
  • Acknowledgments 179
  • Notes 181
  • Selected Bibliography 199
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.