American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment

By Sasha Abramsky | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
OPEN FOR BUSINESS

Surrounded by harsh scrub-ridden desert and enormous saguaro cacti, along with a smattering of cotton fields and pecan farms, Florence, Arizona, is a raw town whose men and women drink hard, at old saloons such as Gibby's Bar, and talk a talk that more delicately constituted city dwellers might shy away from in horror.

These days, as in so many other depressed Main Street communities, there's no shortage of correctional officers. They come from the vast and constantly growing state prison that's been in Florence for as long as Arizona has been a state; they come from the county jail; they come from the two private prisons (one for low-end felons from Arizona, the other mainly for out-ofstate inmates from Alaska and Hawaii); and they come from the sprawling federal holding facilities in the dirt-poor neighboring town of Eloy (some run by the government, others under private contracts) that hold Immigration and Customs Enforcement and U.S. Marshals Service detainees. Many of the guards commute from job-starved communities across southern and central Arizona. Some of them used to be copper miners, with union jobs working the local red-rock mountains. In the 1990s and 2000s, in this state that mines more nonfuel minerals than any other, many of these jobs were downsized as companies sought to maximize productivity. In the single year from 1991 to 1992, Arizona shed nearly a sixth of its mineral-mining jobs, reducing the workforce from 14,900 to 12,600.1 The incarceration industry is taking up the slack.

“Our town supposedly has 17,500 people in it,” mused Don Penson, an iron-jawed retired major from the state prison, whose son-in-law was warden of the privately run Correctional Services Corporation (CSC) Florence West facility, in 2004. “[But] only 3,500 are free-world people.” The rest, he explained, were prisoners. In 1978, when Penson began working in corrections, Arizona had about 3,200 inmates; by 2004 that number had risen to over 31,000 and was still growing.2 The original push for this growth was the tough-on-

-91-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Furies: Crime, Punishment, and Vengeance in the Age of Mass Imprisonment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - From Out of Tartarus ix
  • Part One - A Mindset Molded 1
  • Chapter 1 - The Holy Experiment 3
  • Chapter 2 - A Rising Tide of Violence 23
  • Chapter 3 - Using a Sledgehammer to Kill a Gnat 43
  • Chapter 4 - Victims, Fundamentalists, and Rant-Radio Hacks 59
  • Chapter 5 - Reductio Ad Absurdum 73
  • Part Two - Populating Bedlam 89
  • Chapter 6 - Open for Business 91
  • Chapter 7 - Till the End of Time 107
  • Chapter 8 - Storehouses of the Living Dead 129
  • Chapter 9 - Adult Time 153
  • Conclusion 169
  • Acknowledgments 179
  • Notes 181
  • Selected Bibliography 199
  • Index 207
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 214

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.