First Lady of the Confederacy: Varina Davis's Civil War

By Joan E. Cashin | Go to book overview

NOTES

INTRODUCTION

1. VHD to Rosa Johnston, 13 Aug. 1862, Johnston Papers; VHD to JD, 12 June 1862, JD Papers, AL; Paula Backschneider, Reflections on Biography (New York: Oxford University Press, 1999), 100, 122; Agnes Strickland, Life of Mary Queen of Scots, 2 vols. (repr., London: George Bell and Sons, 1893); Una Pope-Hennessy, Agnes Strickland, Biographer of the Queens of England, 1796–1874 (London: Chatto and Windus, 1940).

2. “Mrs. Davis Dies of Pneumonia,” New York World, 17 Oct. 1906, p. 9, WHC Vertical Files, MC.

3. Elizabeth Blair Lee, Wartime Washington: The Civil War Letters of Elizabeth Blair Lee, ed. Virginia Jeans Laas, foreword by Dudley T. Cornish (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1991), 110; JD to VHD, 9 Dec. 1884, JD Papers, AL.

4. “Mr. Yancey's Speech,” New York Herald, 23 Feb. 1861, p. 2; W. E. B. Du Bois, “Jefferson Davis as a Representative of Civilization,” in W. E. B. Du Bois: Writings (New York: Library of America Series, 1986), 811–814; JD to Ben King, 23 June 1885, BR; “Will” to “Kate” [Polk], 30 July 1864, Leonidas Polk Papers, University of the South—Sewanee.

5. Lee, Wartime Washington, 47–50. On women, see Drew Gilpin Faust, Mothers of Invention: Women of the Slaveholding South in the American Civil War (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1996); LeeAnn Whites, The Civil War as a Crisis in Gender: Augusta, Georgia, 1860–1890 (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1995); George C. Rable, Civil Wars: Women and the Crisis of Southern Nationalism (Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1989).

6. Edward L. Ayers, In the Presence of Mine Enemies: War in the Heart of America, 1859–1863 (New York: W. W. Norton, 2003), xix-xx; David Williams, Teresa Crisp Williams, and David Carlson, Plain Folk in a Rich Man's War: Class and Dissent in Confederate Georgia (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2002); Daniel Sutherland, ed., Guerillas, Unionists, and Violence on the Confederate Home Front (Fayetteville:

-315-

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First Lady of the Confederacy: Varina Davis's Civil War
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Half Breed 9
  • 2: This Mr. Davis 31
  • 3: Flattered and Courted 54
  • 4: First Lady 80
  • 5: No Matter What Danger There Was 107
  • 6: Holocausts of Herself 128
  • 7: Run with the Rest 152
  • 8: Threadbare Great Folks 171
  • 9: Topic of the Day 190
  • 10: Crowd of Sorrows 209
  • 11: Fascinating Failures 227
  • 12: The Girdled Tree 245
  • 13: Delectable City 264
  • 14: Like Martha 283
  • 15: At Peace 306
  • Abbrevations 314
  • Notes 315
  • A Note on Sources 393
  • Acknowledgments 395
  • Index 397
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