Introduction to Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: A Comparative Analysis

By Aaron L. Mackler | Go to book overview

Chapter 2
Methodology in Jewish Ethics

ETHICAL CONCERNS HAVE ALWAYS BEEN CENTRAL TO JUDAISM, and such concerns have been understood within the broad context of Jewish life. Basic concepts in Judaism include God; Torah, or “Teaching”; and the community of Israel, the Jewish people.1 For Jews and Jewish thinkers across a wide spectrum of beliefs, individuals and the Jewish community as a whole participate in a covenantal relationship with God. Torah is central to this relationship and basic to Jewish life. God gave the Torah in love to the Jewish people—and through them to the world. In its narrowest sense, Torah refers to the first five books of the Bible: Genesis through Deuteronomy, traditionally termed the “Written Torah.” More broadly, Torah includes the extensive “Oral Torah” and refers to all Jewish traditional teaching—in fact, all authentic Jewish thought and practice.2

Jewish ethics has been understood within this context, not sharply distinguished from other spheres of life. Indeed, Judaism has no distinct discipline analogous to Catholic moral theology. One example of this holistic approach may be found in the Holiness Code of the Book of Leviticus. This passage proclaims numerous ethical responsibilities, including the mandate to “love your neighbor as yourself,” intermixed with ritual commandments. All represent aspects of the general injunction of this section: “You shall be holy, for I, the Lord your God am holy. ”3 Both ethical and ritual perspectives are important in answering the question, “What ought I do?” For this code, as for the Jewish tradition in general, all aspects of human activity meld together holistically in a life of service to God and one's fellow.

Two additional features of the Holiness Code represent views that have been present throughout Judaism's development. First, the passage is introduced by an instruction from God to Moses: “Speak to the whole

-44-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Introduction to Jewish and Catholic Bioethics: A Comparative Analysis
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Methodology in Roman Catholic Moral Theology 25
  • Chapter 2 - Methodology in Jewish Ethics 44
  • Chapter 3 - Euthanasia and Assisted Suicide 64
  • Chapter 4 - Treatment Decisions Near the End of Life 85
  • Chapter 5 - Abortion 120
  • Chapter 6 - In Vitro Fertilization 156
  • Chapter 7 - Access to Health Care and Rationing 190
  • Conclusion 212
  • Works Cited 239
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 266

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.