Remembering Esperanza: A Cultural-Political Theology for North American Praxis

By Mark Lewis Taylor | Go to book overview

5
CHRIST AS ROUGH BEAST

Revisioning Christ for
Reconciliatory Emancipation

It may be that some rough beast will slouch again toward Bethlehem, its
haunches bloody, its name echoing in our ears with the din of history.

Ihab Hassan

Christ, as central, crowning event of history, is an unfinished event.

Severino Croatto

When Christian theologians risk exposure to their own pasts and to the tensions and brokenness of their times, especially when this brokenness has been reinforced by Christian language and traditions, the reconstructed theologies they offer may bear only a slight resemblance to generally accepted Christian traditions. This may be all the more true of our period, when plurality (political, cultural, religious) and an ever more complex web of dominations – not only of sexism, hetero-realism, classism, and racism, but also of militarism and the destruction of ecological structures – conspire to call forth theological response.

A piecemeal response to one or only a few of these demanding oppressions often founders with respect to others that are neglected. Indeed, it is true that there is a need to specialize, developing theological responses primarily toward, say, sexism or racism. As I have tried to show in previous chapters, however, many of these problematics are so interlaced that they cannot be analyzed separately, nor should they be theologically addressed separately. My way of relating several forms of systemic oppression while trying to preserve their distinctive problematics prepares the way for the christological response that I now begin to offer.

This chapter begins a christology that I hope is broad enough to address the interconnecting of oppressions I have identified while also featuring internal distinctions necessary to preserve christology from becoming yet

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