Interpreting the Prophets

By James Luther Mays; Paul J. Achtemeier | Go to book overview

15
A Maker of
Metaphors: Ezekiel's Oracles
Against tyre

CAROL A. NEWSOM

A recognition of Ezekiels skill in manipulating the power of metaphor
to illumine reality helps us to grasp the subtlety, meaning, and
prophetic force of his oracles against Tyre.

After having been charged by God to deliver an oracle in highly figurative language, Ezekiel protested that he was developing something of a reputation. “Oh, Lord God, people are saying of me, 'He's just a maker of metaphors!' “* (h'lō' memaŝŝel mesalîm hu'; Ezek. 21:5; Eng., 20:49). In truth Ezekiel deserved the reputation, though not the criticism that is implied, for one finds in Ezekiel a greater number of elaborately worked out metaphors, allegories, and symbolic speech than in any other prophet. In the oracles against the nations (Ezekiel 25—32), Ezekiel entrusts a particularly large part of his argument to metaphorical language. Here Ezeldel does not merely use striking metaphors to announce judgments. He often begins, rather, with an image by which a nation might represent itself or one which Ezekiel's exilic audience might have applied to that nation. Then Ezekiel subjects the metaphor to scrutiny. Does it mean what it first appears to mean? Or does it reveal something about the subject rather different from what the audience first thought? How does it stand up to rival metaphors? Finally, Ezekiel uses the metaphor to demonstrate the appropriateness and the inevitability of Yahweh's judgment on the nation in question.

While Ezekiel's original audience may have lacked appreciation of his metaphorical style, the prophet stands a good chance of getting a sympathetic hearing (for his rhetorical technique at least) from modern readers. During the past generation there has been a new perception of metaphor as more than elegant decoration of information that could otherwise be commu-

*All translations are those of the author.

-188-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Interpreting the Prophets
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 287

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.