Why Lawsuits Are Good for America: Disciplined Democracy, Big Business, and the Common Law

By Carl T. Bogus | Go to book overview

About the Author

Carl T. Bogus is an associate professor at the Roger Williams University School of Law in Bristol, Rhode Island, where he teaches Torts, Product Liability, Evidence, and Administrative Law. His writings about products liability and other topics have appeared in law reviews, professional journals, college and law school textbooks, and the American Prospect, The Nation, and Tikkun magazines. He is a winner of the prestigious Ross Essay Award from the American Bar Association.

Professor Bogus received his A.B. and J.D. degrees from Syracuse University and was an editor of the Syracuse Law Review. He practiced law for eighteen years in Philadelphia, concentrating in complex commercial litigation. After leaving practice, he taught for four years at Rutgers University School of Law in Camden, New Jersey. He has been teaching at Roger Williams since 1996.

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Why Lawsuits Are Good for America: Disciplined Democracy, Big Business, and the Common Law
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 1
  • 1: Why Tell Tales? 6
  • 2: War on the Common Law 22
  • 3: The Third Branch of Government 42
  • 4: Disciplined Democracy and the American Jury 66
  • 5: The American Common Law System 102
  • 6: Who Regulates Auto Safety? 138
  • 7: The Three Revolutions in Products Liability 173
  • 8: The Common Law and the Future 197
  • Notes 221
  • Index 259
  • About the Author 265
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