The Fat Studies Reader

By Esther Rothblum; Sondra Solovay | Go to book overview

13
Fat Youth as Common Targets for Bullying

Jacqueline Weinstock and Michelle Krehbiel

Somehow I have managed to make it through high school, but it was
a tough battle laced with thoughts of suicide and depression. I have
had one serious boyfriend, but he always put me down, too … I am
not completely through my journey. I still have issues, depression,
and no self-esteem. I still get teased. (Radiance, 2004)

Are certain youth more likely than other youth to become victims of bullying? Although researchers debate this question, it is increasingly clear that being fat makes a youth an easy and common target for bullies. In this chapter, we explore the extent and impact of bullying on youth who are fat, identify the factors that likely contribute to the targeting of these youth, and reflect on strategies for intervening with and preventing this targeted bullying.


The Problem of Youth Bullying

Youth bullying is now recognized as a serious problem, one with both concurrent and long-term negative effects (Craig & Pepler, 2003; Rigby, 2003). Prevalence estimates range widely across studies, with 15–30% of youth reporting some type of involvement in bullying. Among those involved, 7–13% are bullies, 9–30% victims, and 1–13% both bullies and victims (or bully-victims) (see, e.g., Demaray & Malecki, 2003; Griffiths, Wolke, Page, & Horwood, 2005; Nansel, Overpeck, Pilla, Ruan, Simons-Morton, & Scheidt, 2001; Olweus, 1993). Garbarino and deLara (2002) argue that even the higher-range estimates likely underrepresent the full extent of the problem. Bullying has been identified among preschool children through to adolescents, and may reach its peak in the middle school years (Greenya, 2005; Nansel et al., 2001), with middle childhood being the time period when particular youth become regular targets/victims of bullying (Randall, 2001).

Definitions of bullying vary widely, yet there is increasing agreement among researchers that bullying “is a specific type of aggression in which (1) the behavior is intended to harm or disturb, (2) the behavior occurs repeatedly over time, and (3) there is an imbalance of power, with the more powerful person or group attacking a

-120-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fat Studies Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 365

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.