The Fat Studies Reader

By Esther Rothblum; Sondra Solovay | Go to book overview

40
Are We Ready to Throw Our Weight Around?
Fat Studies and Political Activism

Deb Burgard, Elana Dykewomon, Esther Rothblum, and Pattie Thomas

The authors of this volume are a force to be reckoned with. They constitute over fifty writers, researchers, and activists who are thoughtfully critiquing the status quo of fat-related practices. And they are just the tip of the iceberg. There are now over one hundred books written from a fat-affirmative perspective, including many autobiographical pieces and works of fiction for children, adolescents, and adults. They are stating that the so-called medical reality of weight is all smoke and mirrors.

We can imagine a world in which body size is not particularly salient. It would not be one of the dividing lines used to define beauty/ugliness, winning/losing, health/ disease. In that world, “fat studies” might seem strange and irrelevant. But in our world, body size can determine one's quality of life. This is, in fact, the argument used by many of the people hawking weight loss: “Use our product/service so you can escape from the stigmatized group!” So how can we organize as fat activists, and what are the barriers?


The “War on Obesity”

The “War on Obesity,” proclaimed by former U.S. surgeon general C. Everett Koop in 1996 (CNN, 1996), has become one of the most successful government campaigns. The micro-level battle is often fought between patient and doctor, client and insurance company, employee and employer, or student and school. But the fact that this battle is also fought in the national public policy context creates a perpetuation of this suffering and tends to solidify the construction of fatness as “bad,” thereby leading to more suffering.

Stigmatization of fatness creates a catch-22 concerning health because stigma is known to damage the health of the stigmatized both directly, by creating mundane yet pervasive stress, and indirectly, through poor access to and execution of care. Understanding the role of stigmatization of fatness in this public policy debate suggests

-334-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Fat Studies Reader
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 365

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.