From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain

By Susan D. Pennybacker | Go to book overview

Chapter 1
ADA WRIGHT AND SCOTTSBORO

Camptown Races
De Camptown ladies sing dis song—Doodah, Doo-dah!
De Camptown Race-track five miles long—Oh, doodah-day!
I come down dah wid my hat cav'd in—Doodah, Doo-dah!
I go back home wid a pocket full ob tin—Oh, doodah-day!
Gwine to run all night! Gwine to run all day.
I'll bet my money on de bobtail nag—Somebody
bet on de bay…

I'se Gwine Back to Dixie
I'se gwine back to Dixie.
No more I'se gwine to wander;
My heart's turned back to Dixie,
> I can't stay here no longer,
I miss de old plantation.
My home and my relation.
My heart's turned back to Dixie.
And I must go
The Labour Party Songbook: Everyday Songs for Labour Festivals

*********

Doo-Dah-Day

We march along with a merry song,

Doodah, Doodah

We-re all going strong and we shan't be long.

Doodle, doodle, doo-dah-day

We're out to see that an end shall be

Doodah, Doodah,

Of poverty and tyranny,

Doodle, doodle doo-dah-day.

Going to work all night,

Going to work all day,

Till the profit system's all washed up,

Doodle, doodle doo-dah-day.

Workers' Music Associatio n

-16-

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From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Ada Wright and Scottsboro 16
  • Chapter 2 - George Padmore and London 66
  • Chapter 3 - Lady Kathleen Simon and Antislavery 103
  • Chapter 4 - Saklatvala and the Meerut Trial 146
  • Chapter 5 - Diasporas: Refugees and Exiles 200
  • Chapter 6 - A Thieves' Kitchen, 1938–39 240
  • Conclusion 265
  • Chronology 275
  • Notes on Sources 279
  • Notes 283
  • Glossary 341
  • Bibliography 353
  • Index 371
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