From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain

By Susan D. Pennybacker | Go to book overview

CHRONOLOGY

1927

League against Colonial Oppression convened at Brussels. Jawaharlal Nehru, Ernst Toller, George Lansbury, Palme Dutt, Roger Baldwin, K. N. Joglekar, Clemens Dutt, Jomo Kenyatta. Chattopadhyaya, Henri Barbusse, Harry Pollitt, Fenner Brockway, Garan Kouyate, and founder Willi Münzenberg attend (Feb.). Shapurji Saklatvala tours India.

1928

Sir John Simon, accompanied by Lady Kathleen Manning Simon, leads British Parliament's Simon Commission to India; members greeted by protests (Feb.). Sixth Congress of the Comintern convenes in Moscow (July–Sept.). Textile workers' strike engulfs Bombay.

1929

Police sweep through Indian neighborhoods, arresting militants who become Meerut Trial defendants (March). British second Labour government, elected in May, bans League against Imperialism from meeting in London. LAI meets in Frankfurt. George Padmore, William Pickens, Jomo Kenyatta, James Maxton, Reginald Bridgeman, and Garan Kouyate attend (July). Lady Simon publishes Slavery. Second wave of Bombay textile strikes.

1930

Meerut Trial opens in India. Padmore meets Asian Communists on Moscow visit, makes only prewar trip to Africa, and hosts Hamburg First International Conference of Negro Workers. Kenyatta and Kouyate attend (July). Lady Simon and Sir John Simon tour North America (Aug.). First Indian Round Table talks convene in London (Nov.–Jan., 1931).

1931

Scottsboro defendants arrested and convicted in Alabama (March–April). Padmore speaks on Scottsboro in Leningrad (July). British National Government elected (July). Kenyatta returns to London from Moscow; rooms with Paul Robeson (Aug.). Second Indian Round Table talks convene; Gandhi attends, visiting Romain Rolland in Marseille en route (Sept.–Dec.). Japan invades Manchuria (Sept.). World Congress of Red Aid convenes in Berlin (Oct.). Padmore meets Nancy Cunard in Paris.

1932

Naomi Mitchison visits Soviet Union and encounters Langston Hughes and Loren Miller. Ada Wright and Louis Engdahl disembark at Hamburg and travel

-275-

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From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Ada Wright and Scottsboro 16
  • Chapter 2 - George Padmore and London 66
  • Chapter 3 - Lady Kathleen Simon and Antislavery 103
  • Chapter 4 - Saklatvala and the Meerut Trial 146
  • Chapter 5 - Diasporas: Refugees and Exiles 200
  • Chapter 6 - A Thieves' Kitchen, 1938–39 240
  • Conclusion 265
  • Chronology 275
  • Notes on Sources 279
  • Notes 283
  • Glossary 341
  • Bibliography 353
  • Index 371
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