From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain

By Susan D. Pennybacker | Go to book overview

NOTES ON SOURCES

IN THE SPRING OF 2007 the National Gallery in Washington featured an exhibition that subsequently moved to the Guggenheim Museum in New York, entitled Foto: Modernity in Central Europe, 1918–1945, curated by Matthews Witovsky. The Yale literary critic Peter Demetz contributed an Introduction to its catalogue, and dozens of researchers across Europe are thanked for tracing the images. I passed through rooms filled with graphic design and art photography, searching for references to the wartime Hungarian regime and the German invasion. Just before encountering a very few works devoted to the Holocaust, I paused near some of the only expressly political images in the show. One was Lajos Vajda's Tolstoy and Gandhi, an undated collage featuring photo cut-outs of the principals, flanked by a few other strangers' mounted faces and bodies in skewed disorder characteristic of the genre—one of these was Lenin's.

I stopped short in sudden recognition of the face of an African American woman—it was a clipped head-shot of Ada Wright at the very bottom of the canvas. Wright was banned from Hungary and much of Eastern Europe during the summer of 1932. I was both pleased to see her there and reminded of the disappearance of the very history to which I had committed the last fifteen years of my life. The exhibition catalogue offered no relief. It explained that Vajda left Budapest for Paris in 1929 (where Wright, of course, had spoken), identifying only the work's namesakes and the bust of Lenin. Vadja was a pacifist and the catalogue simply states that “other emissaries of peace inhabit the lower half of the composition.” No one seeing this work in recent times seems to have left any note of Ada Wright's presence, secure in the presumption of her anonymity or unable to imagine how to find out who she was.

The central methodological core of this book is reflected most visibly in the ways in which sources not usually linked are brought to bear upon one another. In some instances, the sources are previously unrecorded, as in some of the Comintern files material, but in other instances, well-established biographies, memoirs, diaries, letters, parliamentary, and private paper collections are revisited in new ways. In this respect, the text engages a hybrid of materials whose selection is driven by the retelling of a series of 1930s mostly known “racialpolitical” narratives, newly organized around the lives of the individual activists at center stage. Many strands of the story are incomplete in archival terms, and the hope is that this exploration will tempt other scholars to take up the individual parts and renovate them, explore them, and recalibrate them in deeper and different ways. James Hooker's short biography of George Padmore, for example, remains the central standard source on Padmore's life partly because no one has linked other kinds of sources to a major new study, or explored the

-279-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
From Scottsboro to Munich: Race and Political Culture in 1930s Britain
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Abbreviations xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Ada Wright and Scottsboro 16
  • Chapter 2 - George Padmore and London 66
  • Chapter 3 - Lady Kathleen Simon and Antislavery 103
  • Chapter 4 - Saklatvala and the Meerut Trial 146
  • Chapter 5 - Diasporas: Refugees and Exiles 200
  • Chapter 6 - A Thieves' Kitchen, 1938–39 240
  • Conclusion 265
  • Chronology 275
  • Notes on Sources 279
  • Notes 283
  • Glossary 341
  • Bibliography 353
  • Index 371
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 382

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.