The Balance of Nature: Ecology's Enduring Myth

By John Kricher | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER 1 WHY IT MATTERS

1. The quote that begins the chapter is from Stuart L. Pimm's book The Balance of Nature? Ecological Issues in the Conservation of Species and Communities(Chicago: University of Chicago Press (1991), p. 4.

2. Several good books each present a fine overview of the various aspects of astronomy and cosmology discussed in this chapter. For example, see F. Adams and G. Laughlin, The Five Ages of the Universe (New York: The Free Press, 1999); B. Green, The Elegant Universe (New York: W.W. Norton, 1999); T. Ferris, The Whole Shebang (New York: Simon and Schuster, 1997); M. Rees, Just Six Numbers(New York: Basic Books, 1999); and L. Smolin, The Life of the Cosmos (New York: Oxford, 1997).

3. See http://map.gsfc.nasa.gov/universe/uni_age.html for a discussion of how the age of the universe is calculated.

4. Images of the collision are available at http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/ sl9/comet_images.html.

5. There is abundant documentation of this reality of mummy preparation. See, for example, http://www.civilization.ca/civil/egypt/egcr06e.html.

6. There is an abundance of websites and books dealing with the naturalistic fallacy. See, for example, http://www.iscid.org/encyclopedia/Naturalistic_Fallacy.


CHAPTER 2 OF WHAT PURPOSE ARE MOSQUITOES?

1. See Richard Dawkins's brilliant book The Selfish Gene (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1989).

2. Hominins include species such as Australopithecus afarensis, etc. We are Homo sapiens, the one and only “wise man.” It is not doubtful that other hominins were “smart,” but we are likely intellectually well beyond them.

3. See http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v400/n6747/full/400861a0.html for a paper that tracks the evolution of resistance to an insecticide in a mosquito species.

-209-

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The Balance of Nature: Ecology's Enduring Myth
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: Why It Matters 1
  • 2: Of What Purpose Are Mosquitoes? 8
  • 3: Creating Paradigms 20
  • 4: Ecology B.C. (“before Charles”) 40
  • 5: Ecology A.D. (“after Darwin”) 53
  • 6: The Twentieth Century Ecology Comes of Age 67
  • 7: A Visit to Bodie Ecological Space and Time 84
  • 8: Ecology and Evolution Process and Paradigm 97
  • 9: Be Glad to Be an Earthling 113
  • 10: Life Plays the Lottery 128
  • 11: Why Global Climate is like New England Weather 140
  • 12: Taking It from the Top–or the Bottom 155
  • 13: For the Love of Biodiversity (And Stable Ecosystems?) 170
  • 14: Facing Marley's Ghost 186
  • Epilogue 203
  • Acknowledgments 207
  • Notes 209
  • Index 229
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