The Spectacle of Intimacy: A Public Life for the Victorian Family

By Karen Chase; Michael Levenson | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

MUCH OF THE RESEARCH for The Spectacle of Intimacy involved peering into small cracks and looking beneath heavy stones. We would have been lost in the shadows, were it not for marvelous help from archivists, curators, and librarians at the British Library, the Institute for Historical Research, King's College Archive, the Public Record Office, the Guildhall Hall Library, the Florence Nightingale Museum, the library of the Royal Institute of British Architecture, and the local libraries in Camden and Westminster. Our graduate students at the University of Virginia were the first to hear these ideas, and to their everlasting credit they didn't sit still. They tested and queried, teased and pondered; The Spectacle of Intimacy would not have happened without them. David Bromwich and James Chandler gave stimulus and resolve to our writing, offering encouragement and advice when we needed to hear them. Margaret Homans and Adrienne Munich provided a hospitable early home for our work on Queen Victoria, which first appeared in their coedited volume Remaking Queen Victoria. Herbert Tucker, who always widens the nineteenth-century horizon, was a canny editor for our study of Victorian walls, an initial version of which appeared in his Companion to Victorian Literature and Culture. Here at the University of Virginia, we chatter amiably with many people who stir us into new thought, among them Stephen Cushman, Jessica Feldman, and Mark Edmundson; Jerome McGann, Jahan Ramazani, and Caroline Rody; Patricia Spacks and Anthony Winner. Gordon Braden has been a great and understanding department chair, but he is an even better friend. Barbara Smith, the indispensable, has seen us through tight places. James Eli Adams and Robert Polhemus were wonderful readers of the typescript, keen and attentive, offering the insight that can only come from generosity. We thank the University of Virginia for the sabbatical leave that made this book possible.

-xi-

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