Kepler's Philosophy and the New Astronomy

By Rhonda Martens | Go to book overview

7
The Epitome astronomiae Copernicanae:
Kepler's Mature Physical Astronomy

It has been ten years since I published my
Commentaries on the Movements of the
Planet Mars
[Astronomia nova]. As only a few
copies of the book were printed, and as it had
so to speak hidden the teaching about celestial
causes in thickets of calculations and the rest of
the astronomical apparatus, and since the more
delicate readers were frightened away by the
price of the book too; it seemed to my friends
that I should be doing right and fulfilling my
responsibilities, if I should write an epitome,
wherein a summary of both the physical and
astronomical teaching concerning the heavens
would be set forth in plain and simple speech.
(Epitome, 845; KGW VII, 251)1

THE EPITOME ASTRONOMIAE COPERNICANAE, contains much of the material from Kepler's earlier works, yet stands out in two very important respects. First, it was written for a more general audience, and indeed it gained a relatively wide readership.2 Second, Kepler's mature physics, metaphysics, and astronomy were presented together for the first time. As a result, it is an invaluable resource for exploring the evolution of Kepler's thought, fleshing out his conception of the relationship between physics, metaphysics, and astronomy, and—since the Epitome was intended as a textbook— uncovering what Kepler believed he needed to do to promote his new astronomy.

The Epitome comprises seven books.3 Books I, IV, and V are of particular interest here, for it is in these that methodological issues are addressed directly and the archetypes appear most frequently.4 In book I, Kepler introduced the discipline of astronomy and the nature of its subject matter. He also defended the thesis that the Earth rotates. Book IV concerns the archetypal and physical structure of the universe, and book V the mathematical representation of that universe.

-142-

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Kepler's Philosophy and the New Astronomy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Figures and Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations of Works Frequently Cited xiii
  • Introduction 3
  • 1: Kepler's Life and Times 10
  • 2: The Mysterium Cosmographicum and Kepler's Early Approach to Natural Philosophy 39
  • 3: Kepler's Apologia 57
  • 4: Kepler's Archetypes and the Astronomia Nova 69
  • 5: The Aristotelian Kepler 99
  • 6: Kepler and Ptolemy 112
  • 7: The Epitome Astronomiae Copernicanae 142
  • Conclusion - The Fate of Kepler's Philosophical Thought 169
  • Notes 177
  • Bibliography 191
  • Index 199
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