8
Kalahari Revisionism
and Portrayals of Contact

Archaeology has three basic perspectives: traditional, processual and post-processual. Traditional archaeology (especially in Europe) is aligned with historiography, as an approach that tries to understand history through material remains. Processualism came into being with the work of Lewis Binford in North America in the 1960s. It is more aligned with anthropology and especially evolutionism and cultural ecology. It uses ethnographic analogy, and it uses ideas from systems theory and the philosophy of science, supposedly to make informed general statements about past societies. However, general statements are hard to come by, except perhaps hypothetical ones satirized by opponents of the approach, like: 'The size of a Bushman site is directly proportional to the number of houses on it' (quoted in Bahn 1996:291). Post-processualism, associated especially with the British archaeologist Ian Hodder since the 1980s, seeks to challenge what it regards as the scientists fallacies of processualism: archaeologists can never recreate a 'real' past. Post-processual archaeologists instead admit a degree of interpretation and subjectivity, and regard archaeology as having political implications. Almost all other perspectives are permutations of these. For example, the New Archaeology is, or was in the 1960s, simply another word for what became known as processualism. Approaches labelled Marxist, feminist, symbolic, cognitive, interpretative, contextualist and so on are essentially permutations of post-processual perspectives.

In the Kalahari, however, there are just two approaches, and they do not fit as neatly into the processual/post-processual distinction as some would like them to. Kalahari traditionalists emphasize the uniqueness of Bushman culture and the relative isolation of Bushman society. Kalahari revisionists emphasize culture contact and the place of Bushmen within a wider political economy of trade, class relations and forced marginalization. The traditionalist/revisionist distinction is not merely archaeological, but is with the same meanings part of discussions in social anthropology and in historiography too. The time depth is considerable, with revisionist thinking pushing relevant periods of contact back some 1,500 years (e.g. Denbow 1984), while traditionalists, perhaps ironically, have often concentrated on the period of their own ethnography. This chapter focuses on the Kalahari debate, its roots in ethnography and archaeology, and some of its wider implications.

-97-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anthropology and the Bushman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: From Early Encounters to Early Anthropology 11
  • 3: Victorian Visions of the Bushman 23
  • 4: Beckoning of the Kalahari 39
  • 5: Amateurs and Cultural Ecologists 53
  • 6: An Original Affluent Society? 67
  • 7: The Return of Myth and Symbol 83
  • 8: Kalahari Revisionism and Portrayals of Contact 97
  • 9: Advocacy, Development and Partnership 113
  • 10: Representations and Self-Representations 129
  • 11: Reflections and Conclusions 143
  • References 149
  • Index 172
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 179

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.