9
Advocacy, Development and Partnership

An Indian anthropologist once told me there were more than thirty hunter-gatherer groups in India, though the Indian government only recognized some of them. He asked how many groups there were in Botswana. I answered that it depends on how they are counted.

There are several points of significance in this very brief tale. It is not just that Indian anthropology follows a positivist paradigm while Western anthropology has a more sceptical tradition. Indian hunter-gatherers differ from those of Botswana in that they tend to be more encapsulated, in forest areas, while those of Botswana live next to other hunter-gatherers as often as they do agro-pastoralists. Selfperceptions are more obvious, and possibly more significant, in the latter case: for example, Naro and Ts'aokhoe (north-eastern Naro) consider themselves members of different ethnic groups, though their language, customs and relations with other peoples are virtually identical. Relations between the state and the foraging populations of India and Botswana are entirely different too. India has a tradition of classifying its ethnic groups; Botswana has scrupulously avoided doing so. In Botswana, all citizens are officially 'indigenous', and Bushmen are classified along with other rural poor as Remote Area Dwellers (RADs) rather than as members of ethnic minorities. Finally, and related to this, relations between the state and anthropology are different too. In Botswana the state is at odds with anthropology's custom of identifying people by culture and ethnicity; in India it is not.


Bushmen, Anthropology and the State

In 1978, Botswana renamed its Basarwa Development Office the Remote Area Development Office, and Basarwa (the Tswana term for Bushmen or San) came to be called RADs. The new name was intended to identify a larger constituency, since non-Basarwa also lived in remote areas. It was also intended quite deliberately to de-ethnicize the category, although in fact the vast majority of those referred to were Basarwa and they came to resent the new designation. Indigenous preferences varied between Basarwa, Bushmen and San, but no one among them to my knowledge ever took to being labelled instead a Remote Area Dweller. As a

-113-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Anthropology and the Bushman
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Figures and Tables vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: Introduction 1
  • 2: From Early Encounters to Early Anthropology 11
  • 3: Victorian Visions of the Bushman 23
  • 4: Beckoning of the Kalahari 39
  • 5: Amateurs and Cultural Ecologists 53
  • 6: An Original Affluent Society? 67
  • 7: The Return of Myth and Symbol 83
  • 8: Kalahari Revisionism and Portrayals of Contact 97
  • 9: Advocacy, Development and Partnership 113
  • 10: Representations and Self-Representations 129
  • 11: Reflections and Conclusions 143
  • References 149
  • Index 172
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 179

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.