Open Fire: Understanding Global Gun Cultures

By Charles Fruehling Springwood | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors

Frank M. Afflitto received his Ph.D. in 1998, from the Department of Criminology, Law and Society at the University of California at Irvine's School of Social Ecology. His first book details the social movement practices and justice perceptions of Guatemalans victimized by state violence.

Christy Allen received a Ph.D. in Sociology at the University of Essex. She teaches courses in American Studies, human rights, and criminology. Her dissertation “Living the Second Amendment” is an ethnography of gun rights activism in the United States, for which she joined pro-gun organizations and attended gun-rights activist training in several states across the US.

Robert Arjet researches violence in American culture as it relates to masculinity, gender, and extremist groups. He received his Ph.D. from Emory University's Institute of the Liberal Arts, and his dissertation on masculinity and firearms in American action films is entitled “Gunplay: Men, Guns, and the Action Films in the United States.”

Eyal Ben-Ari, Professor of Sociology and Anthropology at the Hebrew University, is a widely published scholar whose research spans Japanese society, Israeli culture, early childhood education, military culture, and emotions. His recent books include Body Projects in Japanese Childcare: Culture, Organization and Emotions in a Preschool and Mastering Soldiers: Conflict, Emotions and the Enemy in an Israeli Military Unit.

Carolyn Cooper, Professor of English at the University of the West Indies, specializes in Caribbean literature. She authored Noises in the Blood, a collection of essays on Jamaican popular culture.

Amy Ann Cox, a doctoral student in US History at the University of California at Los Angeles, is interested in the history of firearms and gun-ownership, and gender. Her dissertation will explore the practical uses and cultural meanings of guns in early America.

Sabine Frühstück, Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, is a specialist in modern Japanese cultural studies. She has authored/edited many

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