Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Problems: A Clinician's Guide

By Carolyn S. Schroeder; Betty N. Gordon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 5
Habits and Tics

In the course of growing up, most children will display at least one fixed repetitive behavior that is not always under voluntary control, called a “habit” or “tic.” For most children, these behaviors are responses to temporary physical or emotional needs and seem to help them cope with normal everyday stresses. They typically appear and disappear during the normal course of development. Almost all children, for example, are observed sucking their fists within an hour after birth, then primarily after a feeding. By the preschool years, however, most children suck only at bedtime. Similarly, the use of a transitional object (e.g., a blanket, teddy bear, or doll) increases after age 2, at just about the time when separation and individuation issues peak, whereas the need for these objects begins to decrease after the preschool years. Body rocking peaks between 9 and 17 months, when children begin to sleep for longer periods of time, but it is usually gone by 2 to 3 years of age. Similiarly, head banging peaks between 12 and 17 months. Movement tics (e.g., blinking, shoulder shrugs, etc.) become evident between 6 and 8 years of age, when demands to “sit still and learn” increase; however, these tics also diminish rather quickly for most children.

“Old” habits may reappear with new stresses, such as the birth of a sibling, parental divorce, going to a new school, or the prolonged absence of a parent. Some children “hang on” to a particular habit for no apparent reason, and over time it becomes an automatic, involuntary response. These behaviors or habits are not usually symptomatic of underlying pathology, and only become problems under certain circumstances: (1) The behavior continues longer than is typical; (2) the behavior becomes severe or chronic enough to cause physical damage; and/or (3) the behavior is engaged in so frequently that it interferes with ongoing physical, social, and/or cognitive development. This chapter reviews a number of habits that have been known to create problems for children or their families, including oral habits (thumb sucking, nail biting, bruxism, etc.), hair pulling, and other behaviors (such as rituals and breath holding). Motor and vocal tics are most often transient problems; however, they can persist and/or be indicative of a more serious problem, Tourette's disorder (TD), and thus are reviewed in some depth.


ORAL HABITS

Thumb Sucking

Thumb sucking (which can actually include sucking the thumbs, fingers, fists, or a pacifier) is a common behavior among children; there is evidence that some children begin to suck while

-159-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Problems: A Clinician's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • About the Authors vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I - The Foundation 1
  • Chapter 1 - Development of Psychopathology 3
  • Chapter 2 - Assessment to Intervention 40
  • Part II - Managing Common Problems 79
  • Chapter 3 - Eating Problems 81
  • Chapter 4 - Toileting: Training, Enuresis, and Encopresis 115
  • Chapter 5 - Habits and Tics 159
  • Chapter 6 - Sleep 186
  • Chapter 7 - Sexuality and Sexual Problems 217
  • Chapter 8 - Fears and Anxieties 262
  • Chapter 9 - Depression 302
  • Chapter 10 - Disruptive Behavior 331
  • Chapter 11 - Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder 377
  • Part III - Managing Stressful Life Events 417
  • Chapter 12 - Siblings 419
  • Chapter 13 - Divorce 440
  • Chapter 14 - Bereavement 466
  • Appendix A - Description of Assessment Instruments 487
  • Appendix B - Assessment Instruments 505
  • References 541
  • Index 615
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 624

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.