Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Problems: A Clinician's Guide

By Carolyn S. Schroeder; Betty N. Gordon | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 6
Sleep

Sleep! Throughout our lifetimes this restorative activity is fought, manipulated, embraced, and finally accepted as a necessary part of our lives. The parents of infants have firsthand experience in dealing with interrupted sleep, and many go on to learn about night wakings, bedtime struggles, early risings of energetic toddlers, and the rather bizarre nocturnal occurrences (sleepwalking, sleeptalking, teeth grinding, head banging and rocking, sleep terrors, and nightmares) that are common among children. As children get older, their repertoire of nighttime behaviors expands, and parental responses evolve and become more varied. The types of sleep disturbances seen in children change with age, although sleep disturbances such as bedtime struggles, night wakings, and sleepwalking have been shown to persist over a number of years (Anders & Eiben, 1997). Thus, although sleep problems in children may be common, they do not always go away on their own.

When parents request help with sleep problems, the situation has usually reached a crisis point. It is important for the child clinician to be able to help these parents and their children, as well as to be aware of the role sleep problems can play in other disorders of childhood. This chapter first reviews age differences in normal sleep states and patterns, and the types of sleep disturbances seen in children. Assessment and treatment of the most common sleep problems are then discussed.


NORMAL SLEEP STATES AND PATTERNS

To understand sleep disturbances, one must first have a rudimentary understanding of the physiology and development of sleep. A mature nervous system is necessary to regulate the sleep cycle over many hours, and thus children's sleep cycles follow a developmental course.


Sleep States and Stages

The sleeping person may appear inert, but his or her sleeping state is a complex, highly organized neurophysiological process. Sleep is divided into two distinctly different states: rapideye-movement (REM) sleep and non-rapid-eye-movement (NREM) sleep (Kales, 1969). REM sleep is also called “paradoxical sleep,” because it has features of both deep sleep and light sleep. It is characterized by an irregular pulse and respiratory rate, as well as rapid eye move-

-186-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Assessment and Treatment of Childhood Problems: A Clinician's Guide
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • About the Authors vii
  • Preface ix
  • Contents xiii
  • Part I - The Foundation 1
  • Chapter 1 - Development of Psychopathology 3
  • Chapter 2 - Assessment to Intervention 40
  • Part II - Managing Common Problems 79
  • Chapter 3 - Eating Problems 81
  • Chapter 4 - Toileting: Training, Enuresis, and Encopresis 115
  • Chapter 5 - Habits and Tics 159
  • Chapter 6 - Sleep 186
  • Chapter 7 - Sexuality and Sexual Problems 217
  • Chapter 8 - Fears and Anxieties 262
  • Chapter 9 - Depression 302
  • Chapter 10 - Disruptive Behavior 331
  • Chapter 11 - Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder 377
  • Part III - Managing Stressful Life Events 417
  • Chapter 12 - Siblings 419
  • Chapter 13 - Divorce 440
  • Chapter 14 - Bereavement 466
  • Appendix A - Description of Assessment Instruments 487
  • Appendix B - Assessment Instruments 505
  • References 541
  • Index 615
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 624

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.