Sport and Corporate Nationalisms

By Michael L. Silk; David L. Andrews et al. | Go to book overview

6
All-American Girls? Corporatizing
National Identity and Cultural
Citizenship with/in the WUSA

Michael D. Giardina and Jennifer L. Metz

When a given symbolic national body signifies as normal – straight, white, middle-class, and
heterosexual – hardly anyone asks critical questions about its representatives.

Lauren Berlant


Introduction

On February 15, 2000, the Women's United Soccer Association (WUSA) was officially formed with its stated goal of “launching the world's premiere women's professional soccer league” (WUSA Press Office). Lauded over as yet another positive step in the continued expansion of women's (professional) sporting endeavors and receiving national press coverage on par with the alreadyestablished Women's National Basketball Association (WNBA), the league and its players have not only become central to discourses of female athletic participation and empowerment but, equally as important, it has revealed itself as a key site from which to excavate the construction of “All-American” notions of family and identity in post-Reagan/Clinton America.1 From league-wide community-relations initiatives centering on the family unit and its firm brokerage by such unapologetically American corporations as McDonald's and Sears to its breakthrough ownership matrix and corporate agenda, the WUSA thus stands as a practical exemplar of the rising incidence of the corporate capitalist fashioning of national consciousness. By this we mean that entities such as WUSA – as well as other transnational corporate capitalist enterprises operating on a global scale – are now more so than ever visibly in league with the State in defining the boundaries of “cultural citizenship” (Miller, 1998).

Using the WUSA as a representative case study, we interrogate the union between the State and corporate actors that has been facilitated by the rise and

-109-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Sport and Corporate Nationalisms
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 292

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.