The Business of Ethnography: Strategic Exchanges, People, and Organizations

By Brian Moeran | Go to book overview

–9–
Creative Fields

Now that I have shown how individuals take up positions vis-à-vis one another, as well as vis-à-vis institutions in the field (of ceramic art), I want, in this last chapter, to extend the concept of 'field' to different kinds of activities and to take as my main focus the positions and position-takings of large-scale organizations and their structured components vis-à-vis others in the field.

Bourdieu developed the idea of 'field' in relation to cultural production, and applied it in particular to art and literature. As a result, perhaps, the concept has been seen to have a limited validity. This is unfortunate because it is clearly applicable to other kinds of business activity where 'economy' and 'culture' clash. The London stock exchange (divided into its different parts – Government stock, Mines, Oils and Industries), with its panoply of stockbrokers, jobbers, investment analysts, private and corporate investors, as well as old-boy networks, plus all kinds of related institutions from the Stock Exchange Council to the Bank of England, by way of the Treasury, would be one example. Another would be the toy industry, with its trade exhibitions, retail chains, and manufacturers like LEGO analysing markets, dreaming up product-range ideas, arranging media tie-ups, building theme stores and parks, and all the while concentrating intensely on branding, branding, branding as a means of differentiating itself, its products, its employees, and its customers from competing manufacturers.


Economic Properties of Creative Production

In fact, the toy industry may in many respects be classified as a 'creative industry' and it is on the field of creative industries – in particular, advertising – that I want to focus in this chapter. Any industry that relies on the creative element of design as an important component in the manufacture and sale of its products is likely to find itself having to deal with the not necessarily harmonious combination of culture and economy demands. People working in design – whether of a LEGO brick, a ghetto blaster, a car interior, a soft-drinks bottle and accompanying bottle opener, or my computer mouse – tend to work with functional and aesthetic ideas of one sort or another, while those charged with product development and sales probably have at least one eye firmly fixed on costs that may prevent designers from putting their ideal plan into effect.

-171-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Business of Ethnography: Strategic Exchanges, People, and Organizations
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Preface xi
  • Introduction: Strategic Exchanges 1
  • Part I - Frames 21
  • 1 - Baptized by Fire 23
  • 2 - Analysing Frames 43
  • 3 - Frames at Work 63
  • Part II - Networks 81
  • 4 - Managing Impressions 83
  • 5 - Making Connections 99
  • 6 - Doing Business 115
  • Part III - Fields 133
  • 7 - Exhibition of Virtue 135
  • 8 - The Art of Capitalizing 151
  • 9 - Creative Fields 171
  • Conclusion: The Business of Ethnography 193
  • Bibliography 207
  • Index 217
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 225

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.