Robinson Jeffers, Dimensions of a Poet

By Robert Brophy | Go to book overview

CONTRIBUTORS

TERRY BEERS is Assistant Professor of English at Santa Clara University. He has published in American Poetry, Diacritics, Reading Research Quarterly, and Quarry West. He is currently executive director of the newly formed Robinson Jeffers Association.

ROBERT BROPHY is Professor of English at California State University, Long Beach. He is the author of Robinson Jeffers: Myth, Ritual, and Symbol in His Narrative Poems (Case Western Reserve UP, 1973), Robinson Jeffers (Western Writers, 1975), and editor of Jeffers's Dear Judas and Other Poems (Norton-Liveright, 1977), Whom Shall I Write For? (Laguna Verde, 1979), and Songs and Heroes (Arundel, 1988). Since 1968 he has been the editor of the Robinson Jeffers Newsletter.

WILLIAM EVERSON/BROTHER ANTONINUS, poet of the San Francisco Renaissance, master printer, is the author of Robinson Jeffers: Fragments of an Older Fury (Oyez, 1968) and The Excesses of God: Robinson Jeffers as a Religious Figure (Stanford UP, 1988). He edited Jeffers's Cawdor/Medea (New Directions, 1970), Californians (Cayucos, 1971), The Alpine Christ (Cayucos, 1974), Brides of the South Wind (Cayucos, 1974), and Dear Judas and Other Poems (NortonLiveright, 1975). As master printer he designed an edition of Jeffers Tor House poems, Granite and Cypress (Lime Kiln, 1975). He is the author of a justly famous threnody for Jeffers, “The Poet is Dead.”

KIRK GLASER has finished a dissertation at the University of California, Berkeley: “Journeys into the Border Country: The Making of Nature and Home in the Poetry of Robinson Jeffers and Mary Oliver,” 1993. Currently working on a young adult fantasy novel, he has published poems and translations from the Spanish in The Threepenny Review, Berkeley Poetry Review, and other magazines, including several bilingual publications in Mexico.

TIM HUNT is Professor of English at Washington State University, Vancouver. He is author of Kerouac's Crooked Road: Development

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