The Laws of Armed Conflicts: A Collection of Conventions, Resolutions, and Other Documents

By Dietrich Schindler; Jiri Toman | Go to book overview

No. 33
RESPECT FOR HUMAN RIGHTS IN ARMED
CONFLICTS
Resolution 2444 (XXIII) of the United Nations General Assembly adopted on 19 December 1968INTRODUCTORY NOTE: Resolution 2444 (XXIII) affirms, in paragraph 1, the resolution on the protection of civilian populations against the dangers of indiscriminate warfare, which was adopted by the International Conference of the Red Cross in Vienna in 1965 (No. 29). However, of the four principles of international law laid down in the Red Cross resolution, only three are expressly repeated in the UN resolution.AUTHENTIC TEXTS: Chinese, English, French, Russian, Spanish.TEXT PUBLISHED IN: Resolutions adopted by the General Assembly during its Twenty-third Session, 24 September-21 December 1968. General Assembly Official Records: Twenty-third Session, Supplement No. 18 (A/7218), New York, United Nations, 1969, pp. 50–51 (Engl. — see also Chinese, French, Russian and Spanish editions); International Red Cross Handbook, 1983, pp. 396–397 (Engl.); Manuel de la Croix-Rouge internationale, 1983, pp. 410–411 (French); Manual de la Cruz Roja internacional, 1983, pp. 401–402 (Span.); Handbook of the International Movement, 1994, pp. 373–374 (Engl.); Manuel du Mouvement international, 1994, pp. 387–388 (French); Manual del Movimiento internacional, 1994, pp. 378–379 (Span); Droit des conflits armés, pp. 325–326 (French); ICRC website: www.icrc.org/ihl.nsf.The General Assembly,Recognizing the necessity of applying basic humanitarian principles in all armed conflicts,Taking note of resolution XXIII on human rights in armed conflicts, adopted on 12 May 1968 by the International Conference on Human Rights,Affirming that the provisions of that resolution need to be implemented effectively as soon as possible,
1. 1. Affirms resolution XXVIII of the XXth International Conference of the Red Cross held at Vienna in 1965, which laid down, inter alia, the following principles for observance by all governmental and other authorities responsible for action in armed conflicts:
(a) That the right of the parties to a conflict to adopt means of injuring the enemy is not unlimited;
(b) That it is prohibited to launch attacks against the civilian populations as such;
(c) That distinction must be made at all times between persons taking part in the hostilities and members of the civilian population to the effect that the latter be spared as much as possible;

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